Undergraduate Catalog (2018-2019)

Table of Contents

  1. Policies
  2. Academic programs
  3. Course listing

3 – Course Listing

ACCT 173: Financial Accounting

Fundamental accounting theory and procedures; includes organization of accounts, the accounting cycle, working papers, and the preparation of financial and operating statements. Emphasizes the process of generating and communicating accounting information in the form of financial statements to those outside the organization.

  • 3 credits

ACCT 183: Managerial Accounting

Further study of the accounting process as applied to partnerships and corporations. It also covers manufacturing accounting, budgeting, and decision-making. Emphasizes the process of producing accounting information for the internal use of a company’s management.

Prerequisite: ACCT 173

  • 3 credits

ARCH 431: Readings in Archaeology

Students will read and interact with the periodical Bible and Spade (which has a biblically conservative perspective of the subject) and other publications that relate to biblical archaeology. The student will learn many ways that archaeology illuminates and substantiates Scripture.

  • 1 credit

BCOM 122: Business Communication

Provides the knowledge and develops the professional skills that students will need to communicate successfully on the job. Includes the typing of reports and business letters along with oral presentations. Topics integrated throughout the course include global communications, business ethics, and cultural differences in the business environment. The development of essential skills for professional placement, including resume development, interviewing skills, and job search skills is covered, as well as the development of personal professional skills, including social skills, appearance, networking, attitude, and interpersonal skills in a diverse workplace

  • 3 credits

BETH 132: Business Ethics

This course gives a student an introduction to the impact of information and technology in our world and related ethical issues. Time is spent helping students to develop their own personal value systems and, subsequently, to see how their worldview impacts organizational values. Special emphasis is placed on application of biblical principles.

  • 3 credits

BIOL 111: Anatomy and Physiology 1

A course on the structure and function of the human body. Topics include: orientation to anatomy and physiology; cellular function; tissues; special senses; and integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.

  • 3 credits

BIOL 111: Anatomy and Physiology 1 LAB

This course is a laboratory for BIOL 111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in BIOL 111.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

BIOL 112: Anatomy and Physiology 2

A continuation of BIOL 111. Topics include: endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems; metabolism; fluid and electrolyte balance; and human growth and development.

  • 3 credits

BIOL 112: Anatomy and Physiology 2 LAB

This course is a laboratory for BIOL 112. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in BIOL 112.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

BIOL 124: Life Science

In this course, students are introduced to God’s living creations, focusing on the classification of living things, the animal kingdoms, basic cell structure, and activities of living cells and organisms.

Students also examine the theories of creation and evolution in relationship to the Word of God. As they work through the course, they develop a biblical understanding of man’s stewardship of the earth by studying ecosystems, interrelationships among organisms, and natural resources.

  • 3 credits

BIOL 124: Life Science Lab

This course is a laboratory for BIOL 124. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in BIOL 124.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

BIST 103: Old Testament Literature

A study of God’s self-disclosure as portrayed in the Old Testament. Each book of the Old Testament will be analyzed as to its literary genre, historical setting, and theological message. The student learns the major people, places, and events of each Old Testament book.

  • 3 credits

BIST 104: New Testament Literature

A survey of the content, themes, literary genre, and historical context of the books of the New Testament.

  • 2 credits

BIST 131: Music of the Bible

A survey of music in the Bible. Hebrew and Greek word studies in music specifically taken from the Bible. Emphasis on the current usefulness of what the Word of God specifically teaches concerning music.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as MUSC 131

BIST 218: Life of Christ

An exegetical and historical study of the life and sayings of Christ. Emphasis is placed on the important people, places, and events in the Gospels as they relate to the life and the ministry of Jesus.

  • 3 credits

BIST 222: Wisdom Literature

A study of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, and Ecclesiastes as they relate to practical Christian living. From a study of Psalms, emphasis is placed on learning how to worship God. Psalms and Job offer an analysis of the problem of evil, pain, and suffering. Song of Solomon discloses the nature of true love. Proverbs gives biblical principles of child-rearing and finance, and, along with Ecclesiastes, shows the value of counsel advice and goal-setting.

  • 3 credits

BIST 226: Acts

A thematic, exegetical, and historical investigation of the contents of the New Testament book of Acts.

  • 3 credits

BIST 230: Historical Books

A study of the Old Testament books of Joshua through Esther. Attention is given to the historical context of each of these books as well as to key people, places, and events in the community of Israel during this period.

  • 3 credits

BIST 241: Pentateuch

A study of early human history and early Jewish history as recorded in the Old Testament books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Additionally, attention is given to laws and religious ceremonies of ancient Israel.

  • 3 credits

BIST 251: Biblical Geography

While the student is an active participant on the school-sponsored tour of Israel or other biblical site, he or she must keep a “Study Tour Journal and Response” that shows a studied reflection of the geography, traditions, and people, emphasizing the cross-cultural experiences and their impact.

  • 1-3 credits

BIST 270: Bible Study Methods

Bible Study Methods teaches students the general principles for interpreting the Bible and guides them in making application of those principles in personal Bible Study. Students will be equipped to teach other Christians how to study the Word of God.

The importance of good observation and reading skills as they relate to Bible study will be emphasized. This course provides the student a solid foundation for the study & application of Scripture.

May not be substituted for Hermeneutics for BA in Ministerial Education or AAS in Bible and Theology degrees.

  • 2 credits

BIST 310: Topics in Biblical Studies

A topical course focused on a specific aspect of biblical studies with content varying from semester to semester. Students will do inductive and deductive biblical research to develop understanding of a key biblical topic and its contemporary application.

  • 1-3 credits

BIST 321: The Major Prophets

A study of the Old Testament books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, and the historical portion of Daniel (Chapters 1-6). Each prophet and his message is examined against the historical background in which he spoke.

  • 3 credits

BIST 328: Pastoral Epistles & Thessalonians

A study of Paul’s early letters to the Thessalonians and his letters to Timothy and Titus. Emphasis is given to their practical instruction for Christian living and pastoral ministry.

  • 3 credits

BIST 329: Corinthian Epistles

A study of I & II Corinthians focuses on the historical background, content, and interpretation of these epistles. Major issues such as speaking in tongues and requirements relative to hair are discussed at length.

  • 3 credits

BIST 330: Prophecy of Daniel & Revelation

A study of the prophecies of Daniel and Revelation in order to understand God’s strategy in human history and His great plan for the consummation of this age. Particular emphasis is given to the premillennial interpretation of end-time events.

  • 3 credits

BIST 334: The Minor Prophets

A study of the Old Testament books of Hosea through Malachi. Each prophet and his message is examined against the historical background in which he spoke.

  • 3 credits

BIST 340: Romans and Galatians

An intensive study of Paul’s letter to the Romans and Galatians. Special attention is given to Paul’s theology in Romans which reflects the cardinal doctrines of the New Testament as well as Christian ethics. The relationship of law to grace is given great emphasis. discloses the nature of true love.

  • 3 credits

BIST 422: General Epistles

An intensive study of the epistles of James, Peter, John, and Jude. Background material is given for each book, with major emphasis on the practical admonitions for holy living.

  • 3 credits

BIST 428: Prison Epistles

A study of Paul’s epistles to the Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and to Philemon. Emphasis is placed on the historical background, content, and interpretation of these epistles.

  • 3 credits

BIST 432: Letter to the Hebrews

A study of the Hebrew letter. The course focuses on the superiority of Christ and the New Covenant over that of Moses, Aaron, Joshua, and the Old Covenant. Emphasis is placed upon the continuity rather than discontinuity of the Old and New Covenants.

  • 3 credits

BIST 441: Biblical Foundations of Marriage

An intense biblical analysis and critique of current views and trends regarding marriage, divorce, and remarriage. Special care must be taken to identify biblical connections to present culture.

  • 1 credit
  • Independent study only

BUAD 113: Introduction to Business

An introduction to the contemporary business world, including international and small business, quality, ethics, and career preparation. The role of accounting, economics, finance, management, and marketing activities is investigated.

  • 3 credits

BUAD 273: Legal Environment of Business

Designed to give basic understanding of the law and its effects upon the individual and the world of business. The legal process is examined, including a study of the fundamentals of criminal and tort law, contracts, agency, employment law, business organizations, property, estates, bankruptcy, the Uniform Commercial Code, government regulation of business, and environmental and consumer protection.

  • 3 credits

CHEM 111: Introduction to Chemistry

This course emphasizes the fundamental principles of chemistry: types of matter, physical and chemical processes, atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, properties and theories of gases, properties of solutions, acids and bases, equilibria, oxidation-reduction and an introduction to organic functional groups as they pertain to medicine or biological systems.

  • 3 credits

CHEM 111: Introduction to Chemistry LAB

This course is a laboratory for CHEM 111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHEM 111.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

CHEM 112: Introduction to Chemistry

The second portion of this course emphasizes the major classes of organic compounds: their structure, physical and chemical properties related to biological systems, and nomenclature. Some clinical and pharmacological aspects are also discussed. Special topics may include chemical properties related to radioactivity, nuclear processes and nuclear properties.

Prerequisite: CHEM 111 with a grade of “C” or higher

  • 3 credits

CHEM 112: Introduction to Chemistry LAB

This course is a laboratory for CHEM 111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHEM 111.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

CNSL 204: Introduction to Counseling

An introduction to the basic principles and practices of Christian and pastoral counseling, with an examination of what the Bible teaches about counseling and how it relates to the counseling ministry. A brief look is taken at some of the various theories with an emphasis on how to begin counseling.

Prerequisite: PSYC 101

  • 3 credits

CNSL 321: Topic in Counseling

Coverage of special topics in counseling, such as specific populations, techniques, theories or issues. Content varies by offering.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 2-3 credits
  • May be repeated for credit.

CNSL 325: Basic Counseling Skills

A practical course that gives the student in-class practice of the component skills in the counseling process. This course includes active listening skills, accurate empathy, strategy, and goal setting.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 3 credits

CNSL 336: Problems in Counseling

An examination of approximately 30 potential problem areas (e.g., anxiety, grief, finances) that pastors and other Christian workers may encounter. Particular attention is given to what the Bible says about the problem, the causes and effects, and appropriate counseling strategies.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 3 credits

CNSL 412: Marriage and Family Counseling

A practical course examines the counseling strategies in premarital, marital, and family situations. Students are exposed to several diagnostic tests.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 3 credits

CNSL 431: Crisis Counseling

A practical course that helps the student to understand the dynamics of crises and to get specific skill help for counseling those in crisis.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 3 credits

COMM 102: Introduction to Storytelling

This course introduces students to the art of telling stories effectively. Class content includes instruction in storytelling technique, but emphasizes the practice of oral storytelling, giving students a foundation for further work in children’s ministry methods, pastoral illustrations, or business narratives.

  • 3 credits

COMM 104: Fundamentals of Biblical Communication

An introduction to the study of effective sermon and Sunday School lesson preparation and delivery. Attention will be given to the personal spiritual development of the beginning preacher/teacher as well as his/her development as a professional.

Prerequisite: COMM 201

  • 3 hours one semester
  • Same as MNED 104.

COMM 201: Public Speaking

A study of the principles and types of speech. This course is designed to develop the student’s public-speaking ability through classroom discussion, preparing speeches, and delivering speeches in class.

  • 3 credits

COMM 424: Cross-Cultural Communication

A course focused on the development of skills needed for effective cross-cultural communication of the Gospel. Attention is given to strategic concerns such as the understanding of one’s target audience, the task of identification with that target audience, and the effects of cultural differences on the communication process.

  • 2 credits

COMP 111: Introduction to Computer Technology

This course introduces students to basic computer concepts, computer applications, and various productivity software applications (word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation) as well as basic website design.

  • 3 credits
  • $45 lab fee

COMP 119: Technology Applications for Business

This course introduces students to a range of technologies and tools for business use. Coverage includes the basic MS Office suite (Access, Excel, Word), as well as new and emerging technologies such as cloud and mobile tools.

  • 3 credits
  • $15 lab fee

CREL 204: Religions of America

A study of the distinctive doctrines and practices of the major sects and cults started in America. A special emphasis is on strategies for effectively sharing truth with the cultist.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as THEO 204.

CREL 327: World Religions

This is an introductory study of the history and teachings of the major religions of the world. These non- Christian faiths will be compared and contrasted with the Christian faith. There will be an emphasis on sharing the gospel in a respectful way with the adherents of these religions.

  • 3 credits

ECON 213: Introduction to Economics

Introduction to the capitalist economic system. The first section deals with macroeconomics: aggregate demand and supply, saving, investment, level of employment and national income determination and monetary and fiscal policy. The second section deals with microeconomics: behavior of firms, price determination, efficiency in production and equity in distribution.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 101: Philosophy of Christian School Education

A course that seeks to define and evaluate several philosophical perspectives from the Christian viewpoint. The fundamental questions are considered: what is real, what is man, what is true, and what is moral. Students form their own philosophy of Christian education based on God’s Word.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 109: Introduction to Early Childhood Education

A course that provides teacher education majors with a theoretical and practical foundation in Early Childhood Education (PK-3). Students learn about current trends, regulatory issues, program structures, educator competencies, and developmentally-appropriate practices within the profession.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 112: Principles and Methods of Education

A study of the principles underlying the teaching process and the methods by which these principles may be practiced in the classroom.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 119: Foundations of Literacy

A course that provides students with a foundational understanding of the stages of literacy development and equips them with developmentally-appropriate, research-based strategies for teaching children to read and write. This course will include stages of development in fluency, word study, writing, comprehension, and vocabulary, and how each is affected by social, physical and physiological development. Students will learn how to differentiate literacy instruction of students with diverse needs.

  • 3 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 121: Bible Methods in the Elementary School

A course in which students learn to use material and methods of instruction appropriate to the study of God’s Word in the elementary school. The published curricula of several companies are reviewed and evaluated.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 125: Art Methods in the Elementary School

A course that seeks to enable elementary classroom teachers to develop appropriate intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic experiences as well as the investigation of the techniques and materials used to teach art in the elementary school. The course offers opportunities to explore different media, prepare and display lesson materials, and encourages students to use and evaluate the elements and principles of design in their art projects and lesson plans.

  • 2 credits
  • $20 materials fee

EDUC 211: Phonics

A course in which the students will develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, and phonics in achieving reading success. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of explicit, systematic phonics instruction as part of a balanced literacy program. Students will be taught the “alphabetic principle” – sound to symbol relationship between written letters and spoken sounds, as well as word attack skills, syllabication, and morphology through Greek and Latin roots in word study. This course will provide common characteristics of dyslexia, as well as an introduction to Orton-Gillingham, a multisensory approach to phonics instruction.

  • 3 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 212: Social Studies and Science Methods

A course that exposes students to the materials and activities for use in teaching elementary science and social studies. Students develop teaching strategies appropriate to recent innovations in science and social science, and learn how to organize and conduct meaningful experiences through hands-on investigation. In addition, students gain experience in lesson planning and teaching and learn how science and social science align with other core subjects in the curriculum.

  • 3 credits
  • $15 materials fee

EDUC 216: Math Methods in the Elementary School

A course emphasizing the content of elementary mathematics and the methods and materials useful to teach it. Students discover that children learn best by actively exploring and investigating math, and that problem solving, reasoning, and communication are important goals of mathematics teaching and learning.

  • 2 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 218: Teaching Reading and Language Arts

A course designed to study the basic theories, approaches and methods of teaching reading and language arts using a balanced literacy approach. This course will include explicit instruction on comprehension skills and strategies to build student understanding using a variety of text and trade books. Students will develop an understanding of the reading/writing link and the importance of the writing process. Students will learn to plan, organize and implement literacy instruction as well as support the learner’s development of oral and written language skills. Emphasis will be placed on guided reading and small group instruction to meet the needs of all students at their instructional level.

  • 3 credits
  • $15 materials fee

EDUC 234: Educational Methods, Media and Materials

A course in which students learn to plan, develop and use educational media. Students will be introduced to technologies that teachers may be expected to use in the 21st-century classroom. They will also be given opportunities to implement such technologies in their own teaching.

  • 2 credits
  • $15 materials fee

EDUC 237: Learners in a Diverse Society

This course will examine how diversity – including factors such as gender, ethnicity, disability, socioeconomic status, religious identity, cultural heritage, and linguistic background – impacts the classroom for both teachers and students. Emphasis on providing equal educational access and success for culturally and linguistically diverse learners. Will also consider best practices for relating to families and other school professionals within diverse contexts.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 271: Introduction to TESOL

An introduction to language and literacy instruction, instructional approaches, and assessment models for the teaching of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Student design standard-based lessons and evaluate resources and technologies.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 301: Topics in Education

A course that focuses on issues in education with content varying from semester to semester. As the topic varies, this course may be repeated for credit.

  • 1-3 credits

EDUC 311: Reading in the Content Areas

A course that provides a theoretical basis and instructional strategies for effective reading and writing integration into content-area courses, including social studies, science, and mathematics. Emphasis will be placed on teaching students to be successful in reading and writing using a variety of informational texts. Students develop lessons that enhance literacy development and build content knowledge, applying best-practice research, using appropriate technologies, and adapting to diverse learners.

  • 3 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 323: Health and Physical Education Methods in the Elementary School

A course in which students learn to plan and implement, as well as integrate, both health and physical education into the elementary school. An emphasis is placed upon the development of a healthy and active lifestyle within the boundaries of God’s Word. CPR training and a two-year certification is received.

  • 2 credits
  • $15 materials fee

EDUC 328: Classroom Assessment

A study of the principles and methods of measuring student achievement. Specific attention will be given to the construction of both traditional and nontraditional assessment instruments. Additional focus is upon scoring, grading and interpretation of test scores.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 332: Educational Field Experience

A course designed to provide students with opportunities to observe in a variety of classroom settings. They will observe how pupils learn and will discover appropriate teaching and classroom management strategies. To a limited degree, they will also assist teachers with classroom duties such as tutoring students, reading to students, and supervising student activities.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 360: Teaching Language Arts in Secondary Schools

A developmental and integrated approach to the teaching of language arts (listening, speaking, writing, reading) in the secondary school (grades 7-12).

  • 3 credits

EDUC 370: Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools

A course designed to familiarize teachers with a variety of methods for teaching literature at the secondary level (grades 7-12).

  • 3 credits

EDUC 435: Classroom Management

A course exploring several models of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on developing a personal system of classroom management.

Prerequisite: Minimum of six hours of methods classes or permission of instructor

  • 2 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 437: Educating Exceptional Learners

A course focusing on the individual exceptional child and his or her development, including how the teacher can adapt to meet the student’s needs in the classroom by varying the learning environment, the content, or the teaching approach.

  • 2 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 440: Student Teaching Practicum I

A senior-level course designed to precede the student teaching experience. This course includes classroom observations with outstanding teachers, as well as seminar considerations in the area of instructional planning, lesson presentation skills, interpersonal communication skills, and evaluation techniques.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 441: Student Teaching Practicum II

An advanced-level Practicum course that deals with the practices and challenges of student teaching. It is taken alongside the student teaching experience. Students write case studies and progress reports relating to the students in his/her teaching class and take part in student assessment under the supervision of a cooperating teacher. Field trips and extracurricular activities are also planned and experienced.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 450: Supervised Student Teaching

A supervised student teaching experience in which the student is required to observe and participate in a teaching experience in an elementary school under the assistance of an experienced classroom teacher and the supervision of a college education instructor.

  • 9 credits

EDUC 451: Supervised Student Teaching in Classroom/Music Education

A supervised student teaching experience in which the student is required to observe and participate in a variety of elementary teaching experiences in a classroom under the assistance of an assigned mentor, experienced music teacher, and the supervision of the Student Teaching Coordinator.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 9 credits

ENGL 090 LAB: English Grammar & Composition

This lab meets twice weekly (in supplement to ENGL 090) and focuses on the use of grammar in building effective sentences, paragraphs, and essays to prepare students for ENGL 101.

Corequisite with ENGL 090.

  • 1 credit
  • $50 Course Fee

ENGL 090: English Grammar & Composition

Designed to bring students to the proficiency level of the beginning of ENGL 101. Placement in En 090 is based on the student’s SAT or ACT with Writing essay score. Emphasis will be on developing grammatical accuracy and basic writing competence.

  • 3 credits

ENGL 101: English Composition I

A course seeking to provide a foundation for college-level writing. Focusing on developing skill in analytical thinking and writing, including acquisition of writing heuristics, the class emphasizes skills broadly useful for writing.

  • 3 credits

ENGL 102: English Composition II

A course that seeks to help students develop additional writing and critical reading abilities. Written work focuses on textual response and analysis. Readings and written assignments will address texts of varying genres.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101

  • 3 credits

ENGL 121: Introduction to Literature

A study of literary genres through representative readings. Special emphasis is given to the evaluation and analysis of literature from a Biblical worldview.

  • 3 credits

ENGL 202: Practicum in Drama Ministry

Rehearsal and performance of drama for ministry. In the process, students build their own portfolio of resources for future drama ministry.

May be repeated for credit. Open by audition only.

  • 1 credit

ENGL 221: British Literature

A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. The course seeks to provide breadth of exposure to the subject through study of the works of major, and some minor, writers.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 222: American Literature

A survey of American literature from 1600 to the present. A study is made of the development of American poetry and prose as used by major and selected minor writers.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 301: Topics in English

A topical course focused on some aspect of English language and/or literature, with content varying from semester to semester. Possible topics include authors, movements, genres, periods, dialects, regions, etc. As topic varies, may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102

  • 3 credits

ENGL 315: Children’s Literature

A brief history of children’s literature and a study of authors and illustrators of children’s books from preschool through junior high. Students gain experience from reading and evaluating books from various genres and their use.

  • 3 credits

ENGL 321: Advanced Composition

A course designed to develop and refine students’ nonfiction writing abilities, particularly seeing to hone such features as style, tone, voice. The course seeks to blend reading and writing, analysis of effective composition thereby informing practice in composing. Extensive use of discussion and workshops provides for an interactive course environment.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 323: Modern English Grammar

A course focused on the development and grammar of modern English. The course includes coverage of the history of the language with special attention to grammatical development, as well as coverage of modern grammar and dialect differences.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 325: Young Adult Literature

A study of literature written for adolescents, including an introduction to the genres, authors, and illustrators of adolescent and young adult literature. Special emphasis is given to criteria for analysis, evaluation, and selection of literature for use in the secondary classroom (grades 7- 12).

  • 3 credits

ENGL 333: World Literature

A study of outstanding writings in world literature with the aim of creating a deeper appreciation and compassion for people and their problems through the examples presented in the literature.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 401: Practicum in Writing Instruction

Individual reading, training and practice in tutoring writing and administering a writing-tutoring program restricted to advanced students. The student administers the on-campus Writing Lab under the direction of a faculty member.

Activities include readings on writing-center programs, experiential learning in training and supervising tutors, experiential learning in program assessment.

  • 1-3 credits
  • May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 421: Shakespeare

A brief study of the English Renaissance under Queen Elizabeth and a detailed study of some of Shakespeare’s representative plays.

Prerequisites: 6 hours of English at the 200 level or above

  • 3 credits

ENTR 209: Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course prepares business and non-business majors to start and manage their own business by equipping them with knowledge and skill in the areas of assessing business opportunities, writing business plans, choosing business structures, meeting legal requirements, securing business capital, creating marketing plans, establishing accounting practices, and managing business growth.

  • 3 credits
  • $10 fee

FAHS 231: Perspectives on Singleness & Marriage

A study of proper relationships for the single adult, the dating or engaged couple, and the first years of marriage. Scriptural perspectives are emphasized.

  • 3 credits

FAHS 331: Perspectives on the Family

The study of the family. Topics covered will include the history of parenting, family systems and approaches to parenting, parental influences, parenting
through the life stages, and contemporary issues of parenting including: foster parenting, adoption, single parents, blended families, and adolescent mothers. Family strengths, as well as families at risk, will be evaluated.

  • 3 credits

GREK 223: Koine Greek IA

A course designed to give the student an acquaintance with the basic forms and structure of Koine Greek in which the New Testament was written. Emphasis is placed upon grammar, vocabulary, and translation for the purpose of making Greek a valuable preaching/teaching tool. The student will be automatically charged for BibleWorks and will learn to use it for translation evaluation, lexical studies, and textual criticism.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 224: Koine Greek IB

A course designed to give the student an acquaintance with the basic forms and structure of Koine Greek in which the New Testament was written. Emphasis is placed upon grammar, vocabulary, and translation for the purpose of making Greek a valuable preaching/teaching tool.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 223

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 323: Koine Greek IIA

Particular attention is given to New Testament Greek syntax (uses of participles, infinitives, cases, moods, the article) as it relates to exegesis for the purpose of making practical application to teaching and preaching ministries. Students are introduced to linguistics and its implications for Biblical interpretation, particularly in the area of word studies and exegetical analysis. Some translation work is done.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 224

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 324: Koine Greek IIB

Particular attention is given to New Testament Greek syntax (uses of participles, infinitives, cases, moods, the article) as it relates to exegesis for the purpose of making practical application to teaching and preaching ministries. Students are introduced to linguistics and its implications for Biblical interpretation, particularly in the area of word studies and exegetical analysis. Some translation work is done.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 323

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 423: Koine Greek IIIA

A course in which students translate a Pauline Epistle giving special attention to syntactical constructions and structure. Students are introduced to the rudiments of NT Textual Criticism and continue to develop their understanding of lexical and syntactical semantics and pragmatics

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 324

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 424: Koine Greek IIIB

A course in which students translate a Pauline Epistle giving special attention to syntactical constructions and structure. Students are introduced to the rudiments of NT Textual Criticism and continue to develop their understanding of lexical and syntactical semantics and pragmatics.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 423

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HBRW 233: Classical Hebrew IA

An introduction to Hebrew morphology, syntax, vocabulary, and pronunciation. The best tools are introduced to facilitate exegesis and exposition of Hebrew prose, making Hebrew accessible to a pastoral or teaching ministry. The student will learn to use BibleWorks for translation evaluation and lexical studies.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HBRW 234: Classical Hebrew IB

An introduction to Hebrew morphology, syntax, vocabulary, and pronunciation. The best tools are introduced to facilitate exegesis and exposition of Hebrew prose, making Hebrew accessible to a pastoral or teaching ministry. The student will learn to use BibleWorks for translation evaluation and lexical studies.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: HBRE 233

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HBRW 333: Classical Hebrew IIA

An intermediate level study of Hebrew syntax and exegesis. Students will translate selected portions from the Minor Prophets and OT narratives.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses

Prerequisite: Hebrew 234

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HBRW 334: Classical Hebrew IIB

An intermediate level study of Hebrew syntax and exegesis. Students will translate selected portions from the Minor Prophets and OT narratives.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: Hebrew 333

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HIST 102: Historical Foundation of Missions

This course takes a biographical approach to the study of the history of the Christian mission from the early church to the present. Special emphasis is given to the modern missionary era beginning in 1792. The course seeks to evaluate and learn from the lives and strategies of great missionaries who have established Christianity as the global faith it is today.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as MISS 102.

HIST 121: Western Civilization to 1800

Survey of the ideals, institutions, and persons in the growth of European civilization from antiquity to 1800 with attention given to the roles played by Asian and African cultures in shaping the Western world.

  • 3 credits

HIST 122: Modern European History, 1800-Present

Explores the cultural, social, political, and economic evolution of European civilization from the French Revolution to the present.

  • 3 credits

HIST 221: United States History to 1865

A survey of American history from the colonial era through the Civil War. Emphasis on the American Revolution, the Early Republic, and the coming of the Civil War.

  • 3 credits

HIST 222: United States History since 1865

A survey of American history from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis on emancipation and Reconstruction, the Progressive Era, both world wars, the Civil Rights Movement, and the rise of conservatism.

  • 3 credits

HIST 323: Church History

A survey of the origins and development of the Christian church from its establishment to the present. This will include study of the doctrine, policy, and spirituality of the ancient and undivided church; Medieval Christianity in both continuity and change; the Reformation and the growth of Protestantism; denominational organization and division; the Evangelical Revival; the modern missionary movement; and Christian work and witness in contemporary culture.

  • 3 credits

HIST 433: Early Methodism and the American Holiness Movement

A historical survey of the origins of the Methodist movements in England and the U.S with special attention to their key figures and contemporary literature. Also explores the development of the American holiness revival in the mid-19th century and its aftermath, including the origin and development of the Conservative Holiness Movement.

  • 3 credits

INCS 101: College Success

A practical course designed to assist students in the transition into college life. The primary focus will be on developing necessary study skills, including note taking, close and critical reading, test-taking strategies and in-class writing techniques. Assignments will integrate students’ other coursework, allowing students to put skills to immediate practical use.

Only students with 30 or fewer hours at GBSC may enroll.

  • 1 credit
  • $50 course fee

INFL 101: Information Literacy

This course introduces students to the various ways in which information is organized and stored and to the process of finding, using, and distributing information across various formats. Students acquire experience with resources available online and in print while learning to evaluate the quality of information, use information ethically, and feel comfortable in a rapidly changing information ecology.

  • 0 credits
  • $6 materials fee

INTS 499: Experiential Learning

This course provides students with real world experience in a setting consistent with their academic plan, original research in their field of specialization, or a significant project in their specialty area.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of instructor.

  • 3 credits
  • May be repeated for credit.

LEAD 100: Professional Studies Leadership Organization

Symposia of all students in the Division of Professional Studies, generally held monthly. These meetings focus on personal development, leadership development, and divisional organization and activities.

  • 0 credits

LEAD 121: Introduction to Church and Family Leadership

A study of leadership principles tailored to church and family, providing a unifying foundation for study in various concentrations.

  • 2 credits

LEAD 226: Leadership Seminar

This course is uniquely designed to be a study of leadership that is both biblically supported and highly practical in developing one’s leadership ability. Utilizing J. Oswald Sanders book, Spiritual Leadership, along with the readings of I & II Timothy and Titus and an in-depth study of the leadership principles from the life of Nehemiah, the student will become anchored in a biblical model of leadership. This course will also utilize John Maxwell’s classic book, The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, to provide the foundation for understanding leadership principles that are essential to successful leadership in today’s world.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as MNED 226.

LEAD 405: Leadership and Meeting Management Skills

Class is divided into two sections: (1) Leadership Skills, and (2) Meeting Management. The student learns administrative and leadership principles that will equip him for effective ministry. Conflict management techniques and interpersonal relationship skills are developed. The student learns how to chair orderly board meetings and conference business meetings.

  • 1 credit
  • Same as MNED 405.

LEAD 425: Leading Change and Managing Conflict

This course is designed to help students hone their human relation skills and learn how to influence others. Special attention is giving to leading change within an organization and dealing with the conflicts that occur in that process.

  • 3 credits

MATH 101: College Algebra

Basic concepts of algebra, including real numbers, linear equations, polynomials, factoring, rational algebraic expressions, irrational equations, exponents and radicals, logarithmic and exponential functions, graphs of equations, quadratic equations, logarithmic and exponential functions.

Prerequisite: High school Algebra 1 and 2, or permission of instructor

  • 3 credits

MATH 122: Statistics

Measures of central tendency and variability, probability, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and introduction to nonparametric techniques.

  • 3 credits

MATH 213: Math Concepts and Applications

Covers a variety of topics in math which may vary but generally are chosen from areas such as problem solving, algebra review, elementary statistics and probability, consumer math, voting methods, finance, number sense, geometry, and graph theory.

  • 3 credits

MISS 102: Historical Foundation of Missions

This course takes a biographical approach to the study of the history of the Christian mission from the early church to the present. Special emphasis is given to the modern missionary era beginning in 1792. The course seeks to evaluate and learn from the lives and strategies of great missionaries who have established Christianity as the global faith it is today.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as HIST 102.

MISS 227: Theology of the Christian World Mission

An investigation into the scriptural and theological understanding of the world mission of the church. Consideration will be given to the biblical data on missions in general, and the missionary mandate in particular, as well as the place of spiritual dynamics in its fulfillment.

Issues such as the uniqueness of Christ and the state of those who have never heard will be discussed. The student will be exposed to philosophical arguments for the Christian mission.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as THEO 227.

MISS 235: Field Studies in Missions

With approval of the Divisional Chair, short-term mission trips can be taken for elective missions credit beyond the required missions internship. This will include academic work as well as the requirements of the trip itself.

  • 1-3 credits

MISS 322: Current Issues and Methods in Missions

A study of contemporary issues and trends in missiological thought and practice. Modern methods of missionary work will be surveyed and will be evaluated in light of biblical practices and the history of missions. Consideration is given to strengths and weaknesses of traditional and more recent methods.

  • 2 credits

MISS 328: Principles and Problems of Missionary Life

A course on the principles and practicalities of missionary preparation, life and work. Problematic areas such as fund-raising, cross-cultural stress, field deprivations, language acquisition, worker conflicts, and power encounters will be covered. Ways to maintain spiritual, physical, emotional, and family wholeness will be considered.

  • 3 credits

MISS 421: Cultural Diversity

A course designed to help the student develop a deeper appreciation for and a positive attitude toward other world cultures and civilizations. It presents the approach Christianity should take in relation to other cultures, and the similarities and differences of these cultures with Christianity.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as SOCI 421.

MISS 432: Missions Internship

A course in which the student observes, experiences, and participates in life and work on the mission field under the supervision of a qualified missionary or national. An interactive journal is submitted at the end of the field experience. There will be other academic work.

  • 2 credits

MISS 436: Senior ISWM Seminar

A seminar for all seniors in the Intercultural Studies and World Missions department. The course will include final preparation of the student’s portfolio, various outcomes testing, and planning for future involvement in ministry.

  • 1 credit

MISS 440: Topics in Missiology

A course that provides opportunity for learning, research, and evaluation in a specialized area of missions study. If done independently, the topic must be approved by the Divisional Chair. On the transcript, such a class will also carry the topic studied during the specific offering, for example Topics in Missiology: Introduction to Muslim Evangelism, or Urban Mission Ministry.

  • 1-3 credits

MISS 451: Urban Mission Ministry

A course that focuses on Christian mission and ministry in the world’s growing cities. The biblical basis for urban ministry is presented and effective case studies are presented.

  • 1-3 credits
  • Same as MNED 451.

MNED 103: Ministerial Plenary Session

This Friday session provides students opportunity to be mentored collectively, to benefit from spiritual accountability, and to hear special lectures. During these sessions they will also be exposed to a variety of ministries and ministers from a variety of denominational backgrounds, as well ministry opportunities.

Required for all students in enrolled degrees offered through the Ministerial Education Division.

  • 0 credits
  • two semesters
  • $30 lab fee

MNED 104: Fundamentals of Biblical Communication

An introduction to the study of effective sermon and Sunday School lesson preparation and delivery. Attention will be given to the personal spiritual development of the beginning preacher/teacher as well as his/her development as a professional.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as COMM 104.

MNED 105: Spiritual Formation and Soul Winning

Developing Personal Godliness. The focus of this unit of study is to learn how to become committed, faithful, and consistent men and women of God. The student is given practical guidelines that will help gain the spiritual disciplines necessary for personal godliness.

Soul Winning. In this unit of study, the student masters at least one plan for leading a person to the Lord. The student is required to begin sharing the Gospel with the unsaved and attempting to lead them to Christ.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as THEO 105.

MNED 106: Church Educational Program

This course focuses on equipping the student, using The 7 Laws of the Learner, to participate effectively in the local church’s Sunday School and/or Junior Church programs. The student also learns methods for teaching the Bible throughout the Church’s educational program.

  • 1 credit

MNED 200: Advanced Homiletics

Consideration is given to the finer aspects of sermon preparation and delivery. Attention is given to the continuation of the personal spiritual development of the preacher as well as his /her development as a public speaker

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses; students are charged the fee only once.

Prerequisite: MNED 104

  • 3 hours one semester
  • $289 material fee

MNED 206: Expository Preaching

An examination of the techniques of expository preaching. Special emphasis is placed upon the proper and efficient use of research tools for expository sermons.

Prerequisite: MNED 200

  • 3 credits

MNED 225: Leading Open Air Outreach

This course trains students to present evangelistic messages in the “open air” using a sketch board and/or other methods, including the “Prayer Station.” From the classroom lectures, students learn principles of effective open air evangelism.

Much of the training time is spent on the streets where students participate in children’s meetings or meetings for adults, applying what they learned on campus.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

MNED 226: Leadership Seminar

This course is uniquely designed to be a study of leadership that is both biblically supported and highly practical in developing one’s leadership ability. Utilizing J. Oswald Sanders book, Spiritual Leadership, along with the readings of I & II Timothy and Titus and an in-depth study of the leadership principles from the life of Nehemiah, the student will become anchored in a biblical model of leadership. This course will also utilize John Maxwell’s classic book, The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, to provide the foundation for understanding leadership principles that are essential to successful leadership in today’s world.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as LEAD 226.

MNED 227: The Minister and Finance

This course trains ministerial students in the fundamentals of personal, ministerial, and church finances, including budgeting, basic accounting methods and software, taxes, business relationships within the church, and church building projects.

  • 1 credit

MNED 228: Ministerial Ethics

This course introduces ministerial students to the key ethical issues associated with pastoring, including personal and professional integrity, relations with the opposite sex, confidentiality, home visitation and calling, time use as a full-time minister, use of church property, and relationships to church authority structures.

  • 1 credit

MNED 235: Pastoral Counseling

A practical course designed to provide a Biblical foundation for pastoral counseling including a theology of counseling, core qualities in the role model of Jesus Christ, and the dynamic resources of the Word of God and the Holy Spirit. This course also includes an emphasis on the importance of spiritual care that is uniquely embedded in pastoral ministry.

  • 3 credits

MNED 303: Preaching Holiness

The preparation and delivery of expository messages on the doctrine of entire sanctification. This class focuses on developing the student’s ability to exegete and articulate this doctrine in sermon form.

Prerequisite: MNED 206

  • 2 credits

MNED 305: Conducting Sacred Ceremonies

Class is divided into two sections: (1) Baptism and Communion – the biblical and historical importance of baptism and communion and how to baptize new converts and how to conduct a communion service; and (2) Weddings and Funerals – how to biblically counsel with people who desire to be married and how to conduct a wedding; how to comfort people who have lost a loved one and how to conduct a funeral.

  • 1 credit

MNED 331: Introduction to Youth Ministry

An introduction to the concepts of ministry to the teen cultures of our world. A central objective of the course is the development of a written theology, philosophy, mission, and strategy of youth ministry. Viewing the Basic Youth Seminar is a requirement for successful completion of this course.

  • 2 credits
  • $20 fee

MNED 332: Contemporary Youth Issues

Study of crucial issues facing today’s teenager, including such problems as peer pressure, friendship, dating, sexual promiscuity, music, drugs, and drinking. Key to this course is developing practical, biblical strategies for helping youth know how to handle these issues in a way consistent with loving God and others.

  • 2 credits
  • $20 fee

MNED 341: Advanced Evangelism and Discipleship Skills

The students will further develop their skills in evangelism and discipling new believers. Interpersonal skills will also be developed. Part of the class will be devoted to gaining supervised ministry experience.

Prerequisite: THEO 226

  • 2 credits

MNED 342: Urban Small Group Discipleship and Mentoring

The students will gain proficiency at discipling new believers in an urban environment. The goal of the class is for the students to establish a small group of seekers and new believers, and to find people to mentor as a potential small group leader. The students will work in the city under the supervision of a coach.

Prerequisite: MNED 341

  • 2 credits

MNED 343: Contemporary Approaches to Urban Ministry

In this hands-on course, which blends participation in ministry with classroom instruction, the particular challenges and opportunities of city ministry will be examined. Contemporary approaches to relief work, community development, and racial reconciliation will be observed during a week-long block session.

The class will examine approaches to church outreach/evangelism and urban church planting. The student will move toward constructing a biblical, personal, and contextual philosophy of ministry for the modern urban environment.

  • 2 credits

MNED 404: Pastoral Teaching Practicum

The preparation and presentation of exegetical, Bible-focused lessons designed to engage the student’s mind with the text and guide them to practical application of the truth to their lives.

Prerequisite: MNED 206

  • 3 credits

MNED 405: Leadership and Meeting Management Skills

Class is divided into two sections: (1) Leadership Skills, and (2) Meeting Management. The student learns administrative and leadership principles that will equip him or her for effective ministry. Conflict management techniques and interpersonal relationship skills are developed. The student learns how to chair orderly board meetings and conference business meetings.

  • 1 credit
  • Same as LEAD 405.

MNED 406: Church Growth

The student studies the methods and dynamics of growing churches. Emphasis is placed on learning how to motivate effectively and lead a congregation into becoming a soul-winning, nurturing church.

  • 1 credit

MNED 407: Church Administration and Civil Law

The student is exposed to administrative principles and practices of church administration, focusing primarily on record keeping, including maintenance of church rolls, bylaws, background checks, board meeting and church business meeting minutes.

The church’s relation to the state in also addressed, including how to determine state-specific laws touching churches and clergy, avoiding civil lawsuits, dealing with allegations of child abuse and/or molestation.

  • 1 credit

MNED 420: Ministerial Internship

A course in which the student observes, experiences, and participates in the various pastoral ministries of a church under the supervision of an approved pastor. Includes academic work, preaching, teaching, and other church-related ministries.

  • 3 credits
  • $150 course fee

MNED 432: The Youth Pastor and Program

The essential characteristics of the effective youth pastor, building on the foundational truths of I Timothy 4:12 and emphasizing the necessity that the youth pastor be a godly person. Includes guidelines for relationship to the pastor, to the church leadership, to parents, to the congregation, and to the young people.

Course also addresses principles for the effective organization, administration, and implementation of youth programs in the local church setting.

Prerequisite: MNED 331

  • 2 credits

MNED 441: Urban Church Planting

In this advanced class, students learn the legal and social issues involved in planting a church in the inner city. Spending part of the time in the classroom and part of the time in urban ministry experiences, the students will attempt to build on their work from the previous year and to actually help develop an existing church or plant a new one. A coach involved in inner city ministry will supervise this activity.

Prerequisite: THEO 226

  • 2 credits

MNED 442: Leadership in Urban Ministry

Through guided readings, discussion, and supervised experience in the urban setting, students learn and apply additional leadership skills in their attempt to solidify their ministry work of the previous three semesters. A retreat designed to help students reflect on personal and ministry goals is included in this course.

Prerequisite: MNED 441

  • 2 credits

MNED 451: Urban Mission Ministry

A course that focuses on Christian mission and ministry in the world’s growing cities. The biblical basis for urban ministry is presented and effective case studies are presented.

  • 1-3 credits
  • Same as MISS 451.

MNGM 243: Introduction to Human Resource Management

This course presents the fundamental principles and introduces the functional areas of human resource management. Particular emphasis is given to the integral nature of the human resource management function and its growing strategic importance in today’s workplace. Topics include compensation and benefits, employee health and safety, staffing, training and development, organizational and diversity management, corporate culture, and employee relations. A focus on the development of essential skills for “people management” make this course applicable to any who are, or seek to be, in a management position.

  • 3 credits

MNGM 253: Fundamentals of Management and Supervision

Overview of management discipline as a process involving planning, organizing, controlling, and directing as they relate to personnel supervision. An integrated view of management including organizational behavior is emphasized.

  • 3 credits

MRKT 263: Fundamentals of Marketing

A study of the complex and dynamic activities of marketing functions, explaining the roles of marketing in society and the institutions that compose the marketing system. Focuses on the marketing mix: product development and differentiation, distribution channels, pricing, and promotion, as well as an introduction to buyer behavior and marketing research.

  • 3 credits

MUED 268: Introduction to Music Education

An introductory course in Music Education that concentrates on the role and function of music education and music teachers. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 101

  • 2 credits

MUED 381: General Music: Early Childhood and Elementary

A study of the various methods and materials used in teaching early childhood and elementary students including curriculum design with national and state music standards as well as performing, responding and creative assessments. Course experiences are highly participatory to facilitate improvement of musical and pedagogical skills. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 101, MUSC 268 or permission of instructor

  • 2 credit
  • $20 materials fee

MUED 382: General Music: Middle School

A study of the various methods and materials used in teaching middle school students including curriculum design with national and state music standards as well as performing, responding and creative assessments. Course experiences are highly participatory to facilitate improvement of musical and pedagogical skills. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 381 or permission of instructor

  • 1 credit

MUED 383: General Music: Secondary

A study of the various methods and materials used in teaching secondary students including curriculum design with national and state music standards as well as performing, responding and creative assessments. Course experiences are highly participatory to facilitate improvement of musical and pedagogical skills. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 381 or permission of instructor

  • 1 credit

MUED 384: Introduction to Technology in Music Education

An overview of current technologies as they relate to music education. Topics include computer and internet awareness, productivity software, MIDI sequencing, an introduction to digital audio recording and editing, notation software, and computer-assisted instruction. Applications include Microsoft Office Suite, Audacity, Logic, SmartMusic, Finale and Smart Board Technology.

Prerequisite: MUSC 102

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

MUED 385: Classroom Instruments in Music Education

This course provides students opportunities to become familiar with instruments utilized in the General Music classroom, including but not limited to the Orff Instrumentarium, pitched and unpitched hand-held percussion, various ethnic drums, guitar, and recorder. Elementary and Secondary general music classroom preparation with an emphasis on composition and improvisation with instruments commonly utilized general music classrooms.

  • 2 credits

MUED 387: Percussion Techniques

An introduction to the techniques of playing percussion instruments. Emphasis is placed on tympani, snare drum, and mallet instruments. Observation required.

  • 1 credit
  • 1⁄2 semester

MUED 388: Brass Techniques

An introduction to the techniques of playing brass instruments. The trumpet, french horn, baritone, trombone, and tuba are equally emphasized. Observation required.

  • 1 credit
  • 1⁄2 semester

MUED 389: Woodwind Techniques

An introduction to the technique of playing woodwind instruments. Emphasis is placed on fingering and embouchure. Observation required.

  • 1 credit
  • 1⁄2 semester

MUED 390: String Techniques

An introduction to the techniques of playing string instruments. Violin, viola, cello, and double bass are emphasized. Observation required.

  • 1 credit
  • 1⁄2 semester

MUED 482: Marching Band Techniques

An introduction to the fundamental principles of effective instruction with respect to the contemporary marching band. Opportunities to practice applying these skills in learning how to prepare, organize, teach, and rehearse this type of ensemble are embedded in the course. Observation required.

  • 2 credits

MUED 483: Instrumental Methods

The teaching of elementary and secondary instrumental music. Includes tools for the foundation and organization of beginning and advanced band programs; literature selection; rehearsal techniques; goals, program objectives, student perception and performance; classroom management; clinical experience. Observation required.

  • 2 credits

MUED 495: Early Field Experience

A practicum course designed as realistic training in music teaching through observation, pedagogy, lesson planning, curriculum design, assessment, and teaching in a variety of school settings. Future music teachers learn by observing practicing teachers in the field. Additional instruction will be provided through lecture and reflection on assigned readings. Observation required.

  • 0 credit

MUED 496: Practicum in Music Education I

A senior-level course designed to precede the student teaching experience. This course includes classroom observations with assigned mentor outstanding teachers, as well as seminar presentations considerations in the area of instructional planning, lesson presentation skills, interpersonal communication skills, and evaluation techniques. Observation required.

  • 0 credit

MUED 497: Practicum in Music Education II

A senior-level practicum course that deals with the practices and challenges of student teaching. It is taken alongside the student teaching experience.
Students participate in class discussion, write case studies, and progress reports relating to the students in his/her teaching class and take part in student assessment under the supervision of a mentor cooperating teacher.
The course also facilitates the completion of Music Credentials and Portfolio.

  • 0 credit

MUED 498: Supervised Student Teaching in Music

A supervised student teaching experience in which the student is required to observe and participate in a variety of elementary and secondary teaching experiences in a classroom under the assistance of an assigned mentor and the supervision of the Student Teaching Coordinator.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 9 credit

MUSC 101: Introduction to Music Fundamentals

A music fundamentals course designed for non-music majors and music majors who have little or no previous music theory training. Students who receive a B- or above on Music Theory Matriculation Examination I receive credit for the course.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 102: Basic Music Theory

A fundamental course in basic musicianship, sight singing, and ear training, designed for non-music majors and music majors who enter with a deficiency in the basic melodic and harmonic concepts of music. Students who receive a B- or above on Music Theory Matriculation Examination II will receive credit for the course.

Prerequisite: MUSC 101 Introduction to Music Fundamentals or credit for its corresponding matriculation examination

  • 3 credits

MUSC 103: Fine Arts Appreciation

A survey course introducing the student to art, architecture, and music from a Biblical worldview. This course seeks to enable students to gain a knowledgeable appreciation for and enjoyment of the arts. No prior knowledge of the arts is necessary for this non-performance course.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 104: Notation in Music Technology

Fundamentals of music writing including an overview of standard music notation programs for the computer, with emphasis on Finale.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

MUSC 111: Music Theory I

Studies in melody, rhythm, scale structure, and other theoretical concepts as related to the common practice period.

Prerequisite: MUSC 102 Basic Music Theory or credit for its corresponding matriculation examination

  • 3 credits

MUSC 111: Music Theory I Lab

Lab studies support Music Theory I curriculum and include studies in ear training including rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic dictation; and interval, scale, and chord identification.

Prerequisite: MUSC 102 Basic Music Theory or credit for its corresponding matriculation examination

  • 1 credits
  • $20 materials fee

MUSC 112: Music Theory II

Part-writing, analysis, and application of diatonic triads and seventh chords as related to the common practice period.

Prerequisite: MUSC 111

  • 3 credits

MUSC 112: Music Theory II Lab

Lab studies support Music Theory II curriculum and include studies in sight singing, solfége, and rhythmic reading. Application of functional keyboard skills.

Prerequisite: MUSC 111

  • 1 credits

MUSC 115: Applied Music

First-year applied study in voice, piano, wind and string instrument. Entry by placement audition only.

  • 1 credit
  • $160 applied music fee

MUSC 131: Music of the Bible

A survey of music in the Bible. Hebrew and Greek word studies in music specifically taken from the Bible. Emphasis on the current usefulness of what the Word of God specifically teaches concerning music.

  • 3 credits
  • Same course as BIST 131.

MUSC 133: Intro to Philosophy of Music

The philosophical and biblical basis for music in the church, the music classroom and the Christian home. A study and evaluation of philosophies, ancient to modern, historical implication and cultural associations in light of a Christo-centric philosophy of music.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 135: Church Music I: Foundations and Techniques

A survey of the role of music in worship, edification, evangelism, and missions in evangelical churches, including emphasis on the biblical foundations of Christian worship and ministry, and their implications for those who minister in music. Emphasis on selected techniques for music ministry, including methods for planning and leading worship, organization and leadership of music ministries for all age levels in the local church.

  • 3 credits

MUSC 136: Church Music II: Leadership and Administration

An overview of the use of music in the Christian Education program of the local church, including work with children and amateur musicians.

The course includes methods of planning, organizing, and developing a church music program with criteria for leadership development, cooperating staff relationships, service planning, music in ministry, congregational singing, the copyright law, and the church music library. Applications include MediaShout.

  • 3 credits

MUSC 170: Music Service Organization

Required attendance of music program students to all MSO meetings, designated recitals, music service opportunities and the completion of a portfolio check each semester.

  • 0 credit
  • $20 materials

MUSC 171: Ensemble

Select instrumental and vocal groups formed for public appearances. By audition only.

  • 1⁄2 credit

MUSC 172: Chamber Music

Introduction to basic instrumental and vocal chamber repertoire. Attention given to ensemble rehearsal techniques, tuning and style. Repertoire chosen to suit instrumental collection and voice types registered. Entry is limited to performance level study or permission by instructor. By audition only.

  • 1⁄2 credit
  • $10 materials fee

MUSC 173: Christmas/Oratorio Choir

An opportunity to sing in the annual GBSC Christmas Program in the fall semester and perform a variety of oratorios and standard choral literature in the spring semester. Open to a large number of students. Audition required.

  • 1⁄2 credit
  • $10 materials fee

MUSC 175: College Choir

An opportunity for a select group to perform a variety of repertoire and venues. Regular members are expected to travel. Audition required.

  • 1⁄2 credit
  • $10 materials fee

MUSC 177: Symphonic Wind and String Ensemble

An opportunity for a select group of instrumentalists to perform a variety of repertoire and venues. Regular members are expected to travel. Audition Required.

  • 1⁄2 credit
  • $10 materials fee

MUSC 181, MUSC 182, MUSC 281, MUSC 282: Accompanying

Experiences in accompanying vocalists, instrumentalists, ensembles, and choirs.

Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MUSC 351 or MUSC 261 in Applied Piano

  • 0 credits

MUSC 183: Applied Diction for Singers

Principles of effective diction; use of the International Phonetic Alphabet and related resources; pronunciation rules for English, French, German, and Italian.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in applied music

  • 2 credits

MUSC 211: Music Theory III

Continued study of harmony from the common practice period and an introduction to borrowed, chromatic and secondary chords. Involves analytical principles, form, and part-writing application.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 3 credits

MUSC 211: Music Theory III Lab

Lab studies support Music Theory III curriculum and include more advanced studies in ear training, including solfége, rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic dictation and interval, scale, and chord identification.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 1 credits

MUSC 212: Music Theory IV

Continued study of harmony from the common practice period. Includes an introduction to atonal, serial, and Schenkarian analysis. Analytical principles, form, composition, and part-writing application are emphasized.

Prerequisite: MUSC 211

  • 3 credits

MUSC 212: Music Theory IV Lab

Lab studies support Music Theory IV curriculum and include more advanced studies in sight singing, solfége, and rhythmic reading. Application of more harmonic concepts at the keyboard.

Prerequisite: MUSC 211

  • 1 credits

MUSC 215: Applied Music

Second-year applied study in voice, piano, wind and string instrument. Entry by placement audition only.

  • 1 credits
  • $160 applied music fee

MUSC 221: Music History and Literature I

Music in western civilization traced from antiquity, Middle Ages through the Renaissance.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 2 credits

MUSC 222: Music History and Literature II

Music in western civilization from the Baroque to the early Classical Period.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 2 credits

MUSC 231: Hymnology

A study of hymns, a historical survey of the development of hymnody, and consideration of the use of hymns in Christian worship. Hymns representative of various periods and styles are sung, analyzed, and discussed in class.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 283: Seminar in Piano Literature: Keybard Music 1600-1828

An in-depth look at selected composers and keyboard compositions of the late Baroque and Classical periods (from the English Virginalists to the death of Schubert). Elements of musical style, keyboard writing, favored genres, and performance practice will be included in the discussions. Reading and listening assignments will supplement the in-class presentations by faculty and students.

  • 2 credit hours

MUSC 284: Piano Pedagogy and Literature I

This course is designed to introduce pianists to the art of teaching, the piano mechanism, historical methods and pedagogues, and the learning process through discussions, lectures, and assignments, which explore teaching techniques, materials and methods, appropriate for the beginning and elementary piano student. Students will be given opportunities for practice teaching and observation in both private and group settings in order to gain practical experience. Observation required.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 2 credit hours
  • $25 lab fee

MUSC 285: Methods of Music Program Production

A practical study of how to produce the technical aspects of a church or school program. Experience in set construction, lighting, sound reinforcement, and program production.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 286: Seminar in Piano Literature: Keyboard Music 1828-Contemporary

An in-depth look at selected composers and keyboard compositions of the Romantic and Impressionistic periods, the 20th century and current trends (post-Schubert – current trends). Elements of musical style, keyboard writing, favored genres, and performance practice will be included in the discussions. Reading and listening assignments will supplement the in-class presentations by faculty and students.

  • 2 Credits

MUSC 315: Applied Music

Third-year applied study in voice, piano, wind and string instrument. Entry by placement audition only.

  • 1-2 credits
  • $160 applied music fee

MUSC 321: Music History and Literature III

Continued study of Classicism through early Romanticism.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 2 credits

MUSC 322: Music History and Literature IV

Continued study from late Romanticism to the present.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 2 credits

MUSC 370: Half Recital

A public recital of approximately 25 minutes.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in applied music and consent of instructor

  • 0 credits

MUSC 384: Piano Pedagogy and Literature II

This course in piano pedagogy is designed to provide an in-depth study of materials, repertoire, musical and technical development, and curriculum planning for the intermediate/advanced pre-college student. Independent studio management and planning are core components of the course. Students will be given opportunities for practice teaching and observation in both private and group settings in order to gain practical experience, to learn the art of conducting master classes and adjudicating competitions.

Prerequisite: Piano Pedagogy I

  • 2 credit hours
  • $25 lab fee

MUSC 385: Conducting Techniques I

Fundamentals of conducting to enable students to direct choral groups in educational and church settings. Methods of rehearsal and performance conducting. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 102 or permission of instructor

  • 2 credits

MUSC 386: Conducting Techniques II

Sight-reading of scores, score study and harmonic analysis, baton technique, in-depth rehearsal and performance conducting, and conducting technique for choral and instrumental groups. Observation required.

Prerequisites: MUSC 112, MUSC 385

  • 2 credits

MUSC 415: Applied Music

Fourth-year and continued applied study in voice, piano, wind and string instrument. Entry by placement audition only.

  • 1-2 credits
  • $160 applied music fee

MUSC 470: Senior Recital

A public solo recital of approximately 50 minutes.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in MUSC 461 or MUSC 462 and consent of instructor

  • 0 credit

MUSC 481: Choral Methods

This is a survey course designed to help music educators gain tools for teaching secondary choral music and to equip church ministers to effectively build and maintain a church choral program . Topics to be explored will include choral literature appropriate for a variety of levels and learning styles, methodology involving sight-reading and strengthening musicianship, building a choral program, rehearsal techniques, and issues pertaining to the development of a choral ensemble. Observation required.

Prerequisites: MUSC 211, MUSC 386

  • 2 credits

MUSC 484: Piano Pedagogy Practicum

This practicum is a supervised field experience with assisgned students. Requirements include teaching weekly lessons (minimum: 14 lessons per semester); implementation of a studio policy and payment procedure; demonstration and knowledge of varying teaching methods and their implementation; and weekly meetings with course instructor. Continuity in teaching the same students over a period of consecutive semesters is encouraged.

Prerequisite: Piano Pedagogy and Literature I and II

  • 4 hours, two semesters

MUSC 485: Vocal Pedagogy and Literature

Pedagogy of Solo Voice. Fundamentals of voice production: posture, breath control, tone, diction. Includes a study of vocal repertoire. Observation required.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 2 credits

MUSC 486: String Pedagogy and Literature

Orientation course in methods of teaching string instruments. This course is designed to give specific training to string players in private and group pedagogical techniques and literature. Observation required.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 2 credits

MUSC 491: Choral Conducting Practicum

Practical experience in score preparation, rehearsal planning, conducting. Observation required.

Prerequisites: MUSC 211, MUSC 481, permission of instructor

  • 1 credit

MUSC 492: Instrumental Conducting Practicum

Practical experience in score preparation, rehearsal planning, and conducting. Observation required.

Prerequisites: MUSC 212, 387, 388, 389, 390, permission of instructor

  • 1 credit

MUSC 494: Practicum in Church Music I

A senior-level course designed to precede the church music ministry experience. This course includes church observations in a variety of settings, as well as seminar considerations in the area of worship planning, presentation skills, interpersonal communication skills, and leadership techniques.

  • 0 credits

MUSC 495: Practicum in Church Music II

A senior-level course that equips students for the practices and challenges of church music ministry. It is taken alongside the church music ministry experience. Students participate in class discussion, write case studies, and progress reports relating to the students in his/her assigned ministry field experience and take part in student assessment under the supervision of a cooperating pastor, music minister. The course also facilitates the completion of Divisional Credentials and Portfolio.

  • 0 credits

MUSC 496: Supervised Church Music Ministry

A supervised church field experience in which the student is required to observe and participate in a variety of music ministry experiences under the assistance of a pastor/music minister and the supervision of the Church Music Ministry Coordinator.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

  • 2, 5 credits

PHIL 202: Introduction to Ethics

A study of ethical principles based upon the Word of God which is also used to critique major non-Christian ethical systems. Ethical principles are applied to various contemporary problems.

  • 3 credits

PHIL 221: Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to the principles of philosophy with emphasis on helping the student develop practical critical-thinking habits.

  • 3 credits

PHIL 225: Apologetics

A study of the Christian worldview. Particular emphasis is given to the reasonableness of the Christian faith and to the fact that there is sufficient evidence to support that belief. The Bible is examined in relation to its reliability and authority.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as THEO 225.

PHIL 235: Creation Apologetics

This course involves participating in a 12-week online learning experience with Answers in Genesis, plus doing other readings/activities related to apologetics. The course will provide a firm foundation in the fundamental ideas of creation apologetics.

Topics covered include: the nature of Noah’s flood, implications of death before sin, mutations and evolution, using logic to defend your faith, and a general argument for Christianity. At appropriate points in the course, some important concepts in biology and geology will be studied.

  • 3 credits
  • $35 materials fee (Answers in Genesis fee for online module)

PHIL 325: Logic, Argument and Debate

This course surveys traditional logic, especially classical logic. The course intends to help students understand the structure of different kinds of arguments, understand the features of traditional logic, better develop the ability to think critically, better learn formal and informal logical fallacies, and better learn how to resolve a variety of disagreements. A series of DVDs may be used to facilitate the class.

  • 2 credits
  • $40 materials fee

PHIL 335: Evangelistic Apologetics

This course meets with Evangelism in the Urban Community once per week, but has a distinct set of requirements. For part of the course, students will engage with philosophically-minded skeptics at philosophy meet-up groups (or place themselves in similar situations).

Apologetic debating/discussion skills and human relation skills will be developed during this course.

  • 2 credits

PHYS 111: Introduction to Physics

A course on the fundamentals of physics. Course topics include laboratory procedures, the controlled experiment, methods of measurement, data collection and analysis techniques, and interpreting experimental results.

  • 3 credits

PHYS 111: Introduction to Physics LAB

This course is a laboratory for PHYS 111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHYS 111.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

PHYS 112: Physics 1

A course on concepts and principles of physics. Topics include: kinematics, dynamics, statics, heat, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites: PHYS 111 or appropriate placement test score

  • 3 credits

PHYS 112: Physics 1 LAB

This course is a laboratory for PHYS 112. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHYS 112.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

PSYC 101: General Psychology

An introductory course that acquaints the student with the different domains of study that fall under the classification of psychology.

This course promotes a familiarity with the basic concepts and theories of each area and differentiates between the secular and Christian viewpoints. Some specific areas of study include the nervous system, personality, and styles of learning.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 224: Adolescent Psychology

A study of the psychological and physiological development of the adolescent and young adult. Attention is given to the biological changes of adolescents and the consequences in behavior. Social, emotional, and moral aspects of development are stressed.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 229: Human Development Across the Lifespan

This course provides a chronological overview of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the entire lifespan–from conception through death. It is the study of how and why people change over time or reasons they remain the same. The impact of ethnicity, culture, gender, and religion upon development is examined.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 232: Child Development

The physical, mental, social, emotional, and moral development of children at various stages is studied from the viewpoints of psychology and scripture.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 326: Educational Psychology

A course designed to study the relationship between psychology and education. Some areas of study include purposes of education, classroom dynamics, measurement and evaluation, individual differences, and adjustments.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 329: Abnormal Psychology

A study of the etiology and treatment of the major psychological disorders of childhood and adulthood. The course will review theories of the development of psychopathology and research utilized for the study of mental illness. Classification of disorders according to the current edition of the DSM will be reviewed, including assessment and diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. The course will also address ethical concerns related to the assessment and treatment of mental illness and the effect of culture and diversity on mental health.

Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology

  • 3 credits

RLED 121: Introduction to Church and Family Ministry

Based on Deuteronomy 6:5-6, this class is designed to teach the student key principles to weave the church and family together in such a way that both act as strong partners in the spiritual formation of children. Learning activities takes place within the classroom and within a church setting focusing on practical experience.

  • 3 credits

RLED 122: Church Ministries with Children

This course is designed to help the student develop appropriate age-level activities, workshops, and objectives for the religious education of children. Philosophies of church education of children are also included. Current social and political influences on children are also studied.

  • 3 credits

RLED 202: Children’s Ministry Practicum

A laboratory class using and visualizing some materials for children’s services and daily Vacation Bible Schools. Students create a 5 day Bible lesson program and actively participate in children’s services.

  • 3 credits
  • $45 lab fee

RLED 203: Teaching Doctrine in Children’s Ministry

Systematic study of basic Christian doctrines and how to teach them to children. Approach includes key Bible verses, catechism, stories, songs, and appropriate techniques for presenting doctrine on a child’s level of understanding.

  • 3 credits

RLED 204: Creative Bible Teaching

A class designed for learning style differences in students of all ages. The study and presentation of creative ways to engage learners through drama, hands-on participation, and discussion are covered in this class.

  • 3 credits

RLED 225: Open Air Sketchboard Ministry

This course trains students to present evangelistic messages in “open air” using a sketch-board. From the classroom lectures, students learn principles of effective open air evangelism.

Much of the training time is spent on the streets, where students participate in open air meetings, applying the principles and methods they learned on campus. Class size is limited to six students per track.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

SOCI 202: Principles of Sociology

An introductory study of sociology. Factors underlying the formation and functioning of society, group life, social institution and processes will be considered. Additionally, various current social problems are analyzed.

  • 3 credits

SOCI 345: Culture and Society

A course designed to foster an understanding of the responsibilities and privileges of living in a multicultural community, nation, and world. Students will be taught to think critically about differences and similarities among human groups, to appreciate personally the risks and rewards of engaging others, and to understand the necessity for making the effort in the first place.

  • 2 credits

SOCI 421: Cultural Diversity

A course designed to help the student develop a deeper appreciation for and a positive attitude toward other world cultures and civilizations. It presents the approach Christianity should take in relation to other cultures, as well as their similarities and differences from Christian culture.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as MISS 421.

SOCI 480: Topics in Social Science

A topical course focused on some aspect of the social sciences, with content varying from semester to semester.

  • 1-6 credits
  • As topic varies, may be repeated for credit.

SPAN 101: Spanish IA

A study of the basic principles of Spanish grammar. Oral and written exercises are designed to give efficiency in the reading, writing, and speaking of the Spanish language along with cultural orientation. This course is designed for those with one year or less of Spanish.

  • 3 credits

SPAN 102: Spanish IB

A study of the basic principles of Spanish grammar. Oral and written exercises are designed to give efficiency in the reading, writing, and speaking of the Spanish language along with cultural orientation. This course is designed for those with one year or less of Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 101

  • 3 credits

SPAN 201: Spanish IIA

A continuation of the study of Spanish grammar with special emphasis on speaking and writing. Cultural aspects are included.

Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or permission of instructor

  • 3 credits

SPAN 202: Spanish IIB

A continuation of the study of Spanish grammar with special emphasis on speaking and writing. Cultural aspects are included.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201

  • 3 credits

THEO 105: Spiritual Formation and Personal Evangelism

Developing Personal Godliness: The focus of this unit of study is to learn how to become committed, faithful, and consistent men and women of God. The student is given practical guidelines that will help gain the spiritual disciplines necessary for personal godliness

Personal Evangelism: In this unit of study, the student masters at least one plan for leading a person to the Lord. The student is required to begin sharing the Gospel with the unsaved and attempting to lead them to Christ.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as MNED 105.

THEO 112: Doctrine and Practice of Evangelism

This course will survey pertinent biblical, theological, and historical materials as well as techniques and methods used in personal faith-sharing. Through classroom and field experiences, students will discover their own style of, and develop skill for, one-on- one evangelism.

  • 1 credit

THEO 113: Doctrine and Practice of Church Growth

An investigation into the principles and practices of growing churches. Emphasis is placed upon spiritual health which leads to spiritual maturity and numerical growth. Practices which are both biblically sound and culturally relevant will be stressed.

  • 1 credit

THEO 114: Doctrine and Practice of World Missions

An introduction to missiology from a biblical, historical, methodological, and contemporary development viewpoint. An inquiry into the methods by which the missionary program of the local church can be improved and organized effectively for its missionary task.

  • 1 credit

THEO 115: Doctrine and Practice of Prayer

An examination of the biblical and theological basis of prayer. Class activities are structured to assist students in establishing a meaningful and effective personal prayer life.

  • 1 credit

THEO 134: Introduction to Christian Worship

A study of the theological foundations of Christian worship. The course centers upon the nature of God and resulting implications for worship. To a lesser degree, application of the course content is studied.

  • 2 credits

THEO 140: Principles of the Christian Life I

A Bible-based study of the authority, nature, and principles of the Christian life. This includes discussion of what it means to love God and others, and how loving God and others relates to all the lifestyle issues Christians face, such as entertainment, separation from the world, and interfacing with secular culture.

  • 2 credits

THEO 141: Principles of the Christian Life II

A study of loving God and others relates to responding to believers when they sin against us, gender and sexual identity issues, modesty, adornment, alcohol use, God’s design for reflecting his headship in corporate worship (1 Cor. 11:2-16), and the meaning and morality of music.

Prerequisite for THEO 140

  • 2 credits

THEO 201: Christian Beliefs

A study of the fundamental doctrines of the Christian faith. It involves a study of God the Father (theology), Jesus Christ (Christology), the Holy Spirit (pneumatology), man (anthropology), salvation (soteriology), and living the Christian life. Emphasis is on the best Scriptural references to establish the basic truth about each of these areas. Each study is life-related and integrated with daily Christian living rather than simply “concept” oriented.

  • 3 credits

THEO 202: Doctrine of Holiness

A study of the key passages that teach entire sanctification to be a second definite work of grace in the heart of the believer. The distinction between entire sanctification (heart purity) and subsequent growth in grace (maturity) is emphasized.

  • 3 credits

THEO 204: Religions of America

A study of the distinctive doctrines and practices of the major sects and cults started in America. A special emphasis is on strategies for effectively sharing truth with the cultist.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as CREL 204.

THEO 225: Apologetics

A study of the Christian worldview. Particular emphasis is given to the reasonableness of the Christian faith and to the fact that there is sufficient evidence to support that belief. The Bible is examined in relation to its reliability and authority.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as PHIL 225.

THEO 226: Discipleship and Small Groups

Theological and practical instruction on how to nurture and establish new converts in the faith. Students will learn a curriculum for discipling new converts into mature disciple-makers and a method for equipping spiritual leaders. The course will also instruct students how to organize and conduct small group ministries, especially within the context of discipleship.

  • 2 credits

THEO 227: Theology of the Christian World Mission

An investigation into the scriptural and theological understanding of the world mission of the Church. Consideration will be given to the biblical data on missions in general, and the missionary mandate in particular, as well as the place of spiritual dynamics in its fulfillment.

Issues such as the uniqueness of Christ and the state of those who have never heard will be discussed. The student will be exposed to philosophical arguments for the Christian mission.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as MISS 227.

THEO 280: Hermeneutics

A course examining the principles and practice of biblical interpretation as well as the primary tools of biblical research. The student will become acquainted with the history of interpretation, contemporary hermeneutical approaches, and a defense of the literal-historical-grammatical approach.

Hermeneutical strategies for interpreting various literary genres, analyzing structural relationships, performing word studies, and developing principles for accurate practical application will be learned.

This course is primarily for students in the Ministerial Education Division; other students are advised to take BIST 270: Bible Study Methods instead, although they may contact the course instructor for permission to take this course.

  • 3 credits

THEO 301: Holiness: Critical Issues

This course seeks to analyze the biblical basis for and meaning of entire sanctification, the witness of the Spirit, the regenerating and indwelling work of the Holy Spirit prior to Pentecost, the difference between the Pneumatological and Christological baptisms with the Holy Spirit, and the role of Pentecost in the life of the believer.

This course also seeks to provide a basic introduction to the life and teachings of John Wesley, his understanding of Christian Perfection, and his view of the witness of the Spirit.

Prerequisites: THEO 202

  • 3 credits

THEO 321: Systematic Theology I

A two-semester study of Bible doctrines formulated into a system. First semester: Revelation, God, Man, and Sin. Second semester: Christ, Salvation, Holy Spirit, and Last Things.

  • 3 credits

THEO 322: Systematic Theology II

A two-semester study of Bible doctrines formulated into a system. First semester: Revelation, God, Man, and Sin. Second semester: Christ, Salvation, Holy Spirit, and Last Things.

  • 3 credits

THEO 441: Senior Worldview Seminar

An interdepartmental seminar that serves as a capstone experience giving students the opportunity to speak and write about various current social and ministry concerns within the context of a Christian worldview.

Prerequisite: Must be a senior

  • 2 credits
  • $10 materials fee

Undergraduate Catalog (2018-2019)

Table of Contents

  1. Policies
  2. Academic programs
  3. Course listing

3 – Course Listing

ACCT 173: Financial Accounting

Fundamental accounting theory and procedures; includes organization of accounts, the accounting cycle, working papers, and the preparation of financial and operating statements. Emphasizes the process of generating and communicating accounting information in the form of financial statements to those outside the organization.

  • 3 credits

ACCT 183: Managerial Accounting

Further study of the accounting process as applied to partnerships and corporations. It also covers manufacturing accounting, budgeting, and decision-making. Emphasizes the process of producing accounting information for the internal use of a company’s management.

Prerequisite: ACCT 173

  • 3 credits

ARCH 431: Readings in Archaeology

Students will read and interact with the periodical Bible and Spade (which has a biblically conservative perspective of the subject) and other publications that relate to biblical archaeology. The student will learn many ways that archaeology illuminates and substantiates Scripture.

  • 1 credit

BCOM 122: Business Communication

Provides the knowledge and develops the professional skills that students will need to communicate successfully on the job. Includes the typing of reports and business letters along with oral presentations. Topics integrated throughout the course include global communications, business ethics, and cultural differences in the business environment. The development of essential skills for professional placement, including resume development, interviewing skills, and job search skills is covered, as well as the development of personal professional skills, including social skills, appearance, networking, attitude, and interpersonal skills in a diverse workplace

  • 3 credits

BETH 132: Business Ethics

This course gives a student an introduction to the impact of information and technology in our world and related ethical issues. Time is spent helping students to develop their own personal value systems and, subsequently, to see how their worldview impacts organizational values. Special emphasis is placed on application of biblical principles.

  • 3 credits

BIOL 111: Anatomy and Physiology 1

A course on the structure and function of the human body. Topics include: orientation to anatomy and physiology; cellular function; tissues; special senses; and integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.

  • 3 credits

BIOL 111: Anatomy and Physiology 1 LAB

This course is a laboratory for BIOL 111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in BIOL 111.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

BIOL 112: Anatomy and Physiology 2

A continuation of BIOL 111. Topics include: endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems; metabolism; fluid and electrolyte balance; and human growth and development.

  • 3 credits

BIOL 112: Anatomy and Physiology 2 LAB

This course is a laboratory for BIOL 112. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in BIOL 112.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

BIOL 124: Life Science

In this course, students are introduced to God’s living creations, focusing on the classification of living things, the animal kingdoms, basic cell structure, and activities of living cells and organisms.

Students also examine the theories of creation and evolution in relationship to the Word of God. As they work through the course, they develop a biblical understanding of man’s stewardship of the earth by studying ecosystems, interrelationships among organisms, and natural resources.

  • 3 credits

BIOL 124: Life Science Lab

This course is a laboratory for BIOL 124. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in BIOL 124.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

BIST 103: Old Testament Literature

A study of God’s self-disclosure as portrayed in the Old Testament. Each book of the Old Testament will be analyzed as to its literary genre, historical setting, and theological message. The student learns the major people, places, and events of each Old Testament book.

  • 3 credits

BIST 104: New Testament Literature

A survey of the content, themes, literary genre, and historical context of the books of the New Testament.

  • 2 credits

BIST 131: Music of the Bible

A survey of music in the Bible. Hebrew and Greek word studies in music specifically taken from the Bible. Emphasis on the current usefulness of what the Word of God specifically teaches concerning music.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as MUSC 131

BIST 218: Life of Christ

An exegetical and historical study of the life and sayings of Christ. Emphasis is placed on the important people, places, and events in the Gospels as they relate to the life and the ministry of Jesus.

  • 3 credits

BIST 222: Wisdom Literature

A study of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, and Ecclesiastes as they relate to practical Christian living. From a study of Psalms, emphasis is placed on learning how to worship God. Psalms and Job offer an analysis of the problem of evil, pain, and suffering. Song of Solomon discloses the nature of true love. Proverbs gives biblical principles of child-rearing and finance, and, along with Ecclesiastes, shows the value of counsel advice and goal-setting.

  • 3 credits

BIST 226: Acts

A thematic, exegetical, and historical investigation of the contents of the New Testament book of Acts.

  • 3 credits

BIST 230: Historical Books

A study of the Old Testament books of Joshua through Esther. Attention is given to the historical context of each of these books as well as to key people, places, and events in the community of Israel during this period.

  • 3 credits

BIST 241: Pentateuch

A study of early human history and early Jewish history as recorded in the Old Testament books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Additionally, attention is given to laws and religious ceremonies of ancient Israel.

  • 3 credits

BIST 251: Biblical Geography

While the student is an active participant on the school-sponsored tour of Israel or other biblical site, he or she must keep a “Study Tour Journal and Response” that shows a studied reflection of the geography, traditions, and people, emphasizing the cross-cultural experiences and their impact.

  • 1-3 credits

BIST 270: Bible Study Methods

Bible Study Methods teaches students the general principles for interpreting the Bible and guides them in making application of those principles in personal Bible Study. Students will be equipped to teach other Christians how to study the Word of God.

The importance of good observation and reading skills as they relate to Bible study will be emphasized. This course provides the student a solid foundation for the study & application of Scripture.

May not be substituted for Hermeneutics for BA in Ministerial Education or AAS in Bible and Theology degrees.

  • 2 credits

BIST 310: Topics in Biblical Studies

A topical course focused on a specific aspect of biblical studies with content varying from semester to semester. Students will do inductive and deductive biblical research to develop understanding of a key biblical topic and its contemporary application.

  • 1-3 credits

BIST 321: The Major Prophets

A study of the Old Testament books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, and the historical portion of Daniel (Chapters 1-6). Each prophet and his message is examined against the historical background in which he spoke.

  • 3 credits

BIST 328: Pastoral Epistles & Thessalonians

A study of Paul’s early letters to the Thessalonians and his letters to Timothy and Titus. Emphasis is given to their practical instruction for Christian living and pastoral ministry.

  • 3 credits

BIST 329: Corinthian Epistles

A study of I & II Corinthians focuses on the historical background, content, and interpretation of these epistles. Major issues such as speaking in tongues and requirements relative to hair are discussed at length.

  • 3 credits

BIST 330: Prophecy of Daniel & Revelation

A study of the prophecies of Daniel and Revelation in order to understand God’s strategy in human history and His great plan for the consummation of this age. Particular emphasis is given to the premillennial interpretation of end-time events.

  • 3 credits

BIST 334: The Minor Prophets

A study of the Old Testament books of Hosea through Malachi. Each prophet and his message is examined against the historical background in which he spoke.

  • 3 credits

BIST 340: Romans and Galatians

An intensive study of Paul’s letter to the Romans and Galatians. Special attention is given to Paul’s theology in Romans which reflects the cardinal doctrines of the New Testament as well as Christian ethics. The relationship of law to grace is given great emphasis. discloses the nature of true love.

  • 3 credits

BIST 422: General Epistles

An intensive study of the epistles of James, Peter, John, and Jude. Background material is given for each book, with major emphasis on the practical admonitions for holy living.

  • 3 credits

BIST 428: Prison Epistles

A study of Paul’s epistles to the Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and to Philemon. Emphasis is placed on the historical background, content, and interpretation of these epistles.

  • 3 credits

BIST 432: Letter to the Hebrews

A study of the Hebrew letter. The course focuses on the superiority of Christ and the New Covenant over that of Moses, Aaron, Joshua, and the Old Covenant. Emphasis is placed upon the continuity rather than discontinuity of the Old and New Covenants.

  • 3 credits

BIST 441: Biblical Foundations of Marriage

An intense biblical analysis and critique of current views and trends regarding marriage, divorce, and remarriage. Special care must be taken to identify biblical connections to present culture.

  • 1 credit
  • Independent study only

BUAD 113: Introduction to Business

An introduction to the contemporary business world, including international and small business, quality, ethics, and career preparation. The role of accounting, economics, finance, management, and marketing activities is investigated.

  • 3 credits

BUAD 273: Legal Environment of Business

Designed to give basic understanding of the law and its effects upon the individual and the world of business. The legal process is examined, including a study of the fundamentals of criminal and tort law, contracts, agency, employment law, business organizations, property, estates, bankruptcy, the Uniform Commercial Code, government regulation of business, and environmental and consumer protection.

  • 3 credits

CHEM 111: Introduction to Chemistry

This course emphasizes the fundamental principles of chemistry: types of matter, physical and chemical processes, atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, properties and theories of gases, properties of solutions, acids and bases, equilibria, oxidation-reduction and an introduction to organic functional groups as they pertain to medicine or biological systems.

  • 3 credits

CHEM 111: Introduction to Chemistry LAB

This course is a laboratory for CHEM 111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHEM 111.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

CHEM 112: Introduction to Chemistry

The second portion of this course emphasizes the major classes of organic compounds: their structure, physical and chemical properties related to biological systems, and nomenclature. Some clinical and pharmacological aspects are also discussed. Special topics may include chemical properties related to radioactivity, nuclear processes and nuclear properties.

Prerequisite: CHEM 111 with a grade of “C” or higher

  • 3 credits

CHEM 112: Introduction to Chemistry LAB

This course is a laboratory for CHEM 111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHEM 111.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

CNSL 204: Introduction to Counseling

An introduction to the basic principles and practices of Christian and pastoral counseling, with an examination of what the Bible teaches about counseling and how it relates to the counseling ministry. A brief look is taken at some of the various theories with an emphasis on how to begin counseling.

Prerequisite: PSYC 101

  • 3 credits

CNSL 321: Topic in Counseling

Coverage of special topics in counseling, such as specific populations, techniques, theories or issues. Content varies by offering.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 2-3 credits
  • May be repeated for credit.

CNSL 325: Basic Counseling Skills

A practical course that gives the student in-class practice of the component skills in the counseling process. This course includes active listening skills, accurate empathy, strategy, and goal setting.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 3 credits

CNSL 336: Problems in Counseling

An examination of approximately 30 potential problem areas (e.g., anxiety, grief, finances) that pastors and other Christian workers may encounter. Particular attention is given to what the Bible says about the problem, the causes and effects, and appropriate counseling strategies.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 3 credits

CNSL 412: Marriage and Family Counseling

A practical course examines the counseling strategies in premarital, marital, and family situations. Students are exposed to several diagnostic tests.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 3 credits

CNSL 431: Crisis Counseling

A practical course that helps the student to understand the dynamics of crises and to get specific skill help for counseling those in crisis.

Prerequisite: CNSL 204

  • 3 credits

COMM 102: Introduction to Storytelling

This course introduces students to the art of telling stories effectively. Class content includes instruction in storytelling technique, but emphasizes the practice of oral storytelling, giving students a foundation for further work in children’s ministry methods, pastoral illustrations, or business narratives.

  • 3 credits

COMM 104: Fundamentals of Biblical Communication

An introduction to the study of effective sermon and Sunday School lesson preparation and delivery. Attention will be given to the personal spiritual development of the beginning preacher/teacher as well as his/her development as a professional.

Prerequisite: COMM 201

  • 3 hours one semester
  • Same as MNED 104.

COMM 201: Public Speaking

A study of the principles and types of speech. This course is designed to develop the student’s public-speaking ability through classroom discussion, preparing speeches, and delivering speeches in class.

  • 3 credits

COMM 424: Cross-Cultural Communication

A course focused on the development of skills needed for effective cross-cultural communication of the Gospel. Attention is given to strategic concerns such as the understanding of one’s target audience, the task of identification with that target audience, and the effects of cultural differences on the communication process.

  • 2 credits

COMP 111: Introduction to Computer Technology

This course introduces students to basic computer concepts, computer applications, and various productivity software applications (word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation) as well as basic website design.

  • 3 credits
  • $45 lab fee

COMP 119: Technology Applications for Business

This course introduces students to a range of technologies and tools for business use. Coverage includes the basic MS Office suite (Access, Excel, Word), as well as new and emerging technologies such as cloud and mobile tools.

  • 3 credits
  • $15 lab fee

CREL 204: Religions of America

A study of the distinctive doctrines and practices of the major sects and cults started in America. A special emphasis is on strategies for effectively sharing truth with the cultist.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as THEO 204.

CREL 327: World Religions

This is an introductory study of the history and teachings of the major religions of the world. These non- Christian faiths will be compared and contrasted with the Christian faith. There will be an emphasis on sharing the gospel in a respectful way with the adherents of these religions.

  • 3 credits

ECON 213: Introduction to Economics

Introduction to the capitalist economic system. The first section deals with macroeconomics: aggregate demand and supply, saving, investment, level of employment and national income determination and monetary and fiscal policy. The second section deals with microeconomics: behavior of firms, price determination, efficiency in production and equity in distribution.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 101: Philosophy of Christian School Education

A course that seeks to define and evaluate several philosophical perspectives from the Christian viewpoint. The fundamental questions are considered: what is real, what is man, what is true, and what is moral. Students form their own philosophy of Christian education based on God’s Word.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 109: Introduction to Early Childhood Education

A course that provides teacher education majors with a theoretical and practical foundation in Early Childhood Education (PK-3). Students learn about current trends, regulatory issues, program structures, educator competencies, and developmentally-appropriate practices within the profession.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 112: Principles and Methods of Education

A study of the principles underlying the teaching process and the methods by which these principles may be practiced in the classroom.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 119: Foundations of Literacy

A course that provides students with a foundational understanding of the stages of literacy development and equips them with developmentally-appropriate, research-based strategies for teaching children to read and write. This course will include stages of development in fluency, word study, writing, comprehension, and vocabulary, and how each is affected by social, physical and physiological development. Students will learn how to differentiate literacy instruction of students with diverse needs.

  • 3 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 121: Bible Methods in the Elementary School

A course in which students learn to use material and methods of instruction appropriate to the study of God’s Word in the elementary school. The published curricula of several companies are reviewed and evaluated.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 125: Art Methods in the Elementary School

A course that seeks to enable elementary classroom teachers to develop appropriate intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic experiences as well as the investigation of the techniques and materials used to teach art in the elementary school. The course offers opportunities to explore different media, prepare and display lesson materials, and encourages students to use and evaluate the elements and principles of design in their art projects and lesson plans.

  • 2 credits
  • $20 materials fee

EDUC 211: Phonics

A course in which the students will develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, and phonics in achieving reading success. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of explicit, systematic phonics instruction as part of a balanced literacy program. Students will be taught the “alphabetic principle” – sound to symbol relationship between written letters and spoken sounds, as well as word attack skills, syllabication, and morphology through Greek and Latin roots in word study. This course will provide common characteristics of dyslexia, as well as an introduction to Orton-Gillingham, a multisensory approach to phonics instruction.

  • 3 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 212: Social Studies and Science Methods

A course that exposes students to the materials and activities for use in teaching elementary science and social studies. Students develop teaching strategies appropriate to recent innovations in science and social science, and learn how to organize and conduct meaningful experiences through hands-on investigation. In addition, students gain experience in lesson planning and teaching and learn how science and social science align with other core subjects in the curriculum.

  • 3 credits
  • $15 materials fee

EDUC 216: Math Methods in the Elementary School

A course emphasizing the content of elementary mathematics and the methods and materials useful to teach it. Students discover that children learn best by actively exploring and investigating math, and that problem solving, reasoning, and communication are important goals of mathematics teaching and learning.

  • 2 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 218: Teaching Reading and Language Arts

A course designed to study the basic theories, approaches and methods of teaching reading and language arts using a balanced literacy approach. This course will include explicit instruction on comprehension skills and strategies to build student understanding using a variety of text and trade books. Students will develop an understanding of the reading/writing link and the importance of the writing process. Students will learn to plan, organize and implement literacy instruction as well as support the learner’s development of oral and written language skills. Emphasis will be placed on guided reading and small group instruction to meet the needs of all students at their instructional level.

  • 3 credits
  • $15 materials fee

EDUC 234: Educational Methods, Media and Materials

A course in which students learn to plan, develop and use educational media. Students will be introduced to technologies that teachers may be expected to use in the 21st-century classroom. They will also be given opportunities to implement such technologies in their own teaching.

  • 2 credits
  • $15 materials fee

EDUC 237: Learners in a Diverse Society

This course will examine how diversity – including factors such as gender, ethnicity, disability, socioeconomic status, religious identity, cultural heritage, and linguistic background – impacts the classroom for both teachers and students. Emphasis on providing equal educational access and success for culturally and linguistically diverse learners. Will also consider best practices for relating to families and other school professionals within diverse contexts.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 271: Introduction to TESOL

An introduction to language and literacy instruction, instructional approaches, and assessment models for the teaching of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Student design standard-based lessons and evaluate resources and technologies.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 301: Topics in Education

A course that focuses on issues in education with content varying from semester to semester. As the topic varies, this course may be repeated for credit.

  • 1-3 credits

EDUC 311: Reading in the Content Areas

A course that provides a theoretical basis and instructional strategies for effective reading and writing integration into content-area courses, including social studies, science, and mathematics. Emphasis will be placed on teaching students to be successful in reading and writing using a variety of informational texts. Students develop lessons that enhance literacy development and build content knowledge, applying best-practice research, using appropriate technologies, and adapting to diverse learners.

  • 3 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 323: Health and Physical Education Methods in the Elementary School

A course in which students learn to plan and implement, as well as integrate, both health and physical education into the elementary school. An emphasis is placed upon the development of a healthy and active lifestyle within the boundaries of God’s Word. CPR training and a two-year certification is received.

  • 2 credits
  • $15 materials fee

EDUC 328: Classroom Assessment

A study of the principles and methods of measuring student achievement. Specific attention will be given to the construction of both traditional and nontraditional assessment instruments. Additional focus is upon scoring, grading and interpretation of test scores.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 332: Educational Field Experience

A course designed to provide students with opportunities to observe in a variety of classroom settings. They will observe how pupils learn and will discover appropriate teaching and classroom management strategies. To a limited degree, they will also assist teachers with classroom duties such as tutoring students, reading to students, and supervising student activities.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 360: Teaching Language Arts in Secondary Schools

A developmental and integrated approach to the teaching of language arts (listening, speaking, writing, reading) in the secondary school (grades 7-12).

  • 3 credits

EDUC 370: Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools

A course designed to familiarize teachers with a variety of methods for teaching literature at the secondary level (grades 7-12).

  • 3 credits

EDUC 435: Classroom Management

A course exploring several models of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on developing a personal system of classroom management.

Prerequisite: Minimum of six hours of methods classes or permission of instructor

  • 2 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 437: Educating Exceptional Learners

A course focusing on the individual exceptional child and his or her development, including how the teacher can adapt to meet the student’s needs in the classroom by varying the learning environment, the content, or the teaching approach.

  • 2 credits
  • $10 materials fee

EDUC 440: Student Teaching Practicum I

A senior-level course designed to precede the student teaching experience. This course includes classroom observations with outstanding teachers, as well as seminar considerations in the area of instructional planning, lesson presentation skills, interpersonal communication skills, and evaluation techniques.

  • 2 credits

EDUC 441: Student Teaching Practicum II

An advanced-level Practicum course that deals with the practices and challenges of student teaching. It is taken alongside the student teaching experience. Students write case studies and progress reports relating to the students in his/her teaching class and take part in student assessment under the supervision of a cooperating teacher. Field trips and extracurricular activities are also planned and experienced.

  • 3 credits

EDUC 450: Supervised Student Teaching

A supervised student teaching experience in which the student is required to observe and participate in a teaching experience in an elementary school under the assistance of an experienced classroom teacher and the supervision of a college education instructor.

  • 9 credits

EDUC 451: Supervised Student Teaching in Classroom/Music Education

A supervised student teaching experience in which the student is required to observe and participate in a variety of elementary teaching experiences in a classroom under the assistance of an assigned mentor, experienced music teacher, and the supervision of the Student Teaching Coordinator.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 9 credits

ENGL 090 LAB: English Grammar & Composition

This lab meets twice weekly (in supplement to ENGL 090) and focuses on the use of grammar in building effective sentences, paragraphs, and essays to prepare students for ENGL 101.

Corequisite with ENGL 090.

  • 1 credit
  • $50 Course Fee

ENGL 090: English Grammar & Composition

Designed to bring students to the proficiency level of the beginning of ENGL 101. Placement in En 090 is based on the student’s SAT or ACT with Writing essay score. Emphasis will be on developing grammatical accuracy and basic writing competence.

  • 3 credits

ENGL 101: English Composition I

A course seeking to provide a foundation for college-level writing. Focusing on developing skill in analytical thinking and writing, including acquisition of writing heuristics, the class emphasizes skills broadly useful for writing.

  • 3 credits

ENGL 102: English Composition II

A course that seeks to help students develop additional writing and critical reading abilities. Written work focuses on textual response and analysis. Readings and written assignments will address texts of varying genres.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101

  • 3 credits

ENGL 121: Introduction to Literature

A study of literary genres through representative readings. Special emphasis is given to the evaluation and analysis of literature from a Biblical worldview.

  • 3 credits

ENGL 202: Practicum in Drama Ministry

Rehearsal and performance of drama for ministry. In the process, students build their own portfolio of resources for future drama ministry.

May be repeated for credit. Open by audition only.

  • 1 credit

ENGL 221: British Literature

A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. The course seeks to provide breadth of exposure to the subject through study of the works of major, and some minor, writers.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 222: American Literature

A survey of American literature from 1600 to the present. A study is made of the development of American poetry and prose as used by major and selected minor writers.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 301: Topics in English

A topical course focused on some aspect of English language and/or literature, with content varying from semester to semester. Possible topics include authors, movements, genres, periods, dialects, regions, etc. As topic varies, may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102

  • 3 credits

ENGL 315: Children’s Literature

A brief history of children’s literature and a study of authors and illustrators of children’s books from preschool through junior high. Students gain experience from reading and evaluating books from various genres and their use.

  • 3 credits

ENGL 321: Advanced Composition

A course designed to develop and refine students’ nonfiction writing abilities, particularly seeing to hone such features as style, tone, voice. The course seeks to blend reading and writing, analysis of effective composition thereby informing practice in composing. Extensive use of discussion and workshops provides for an interactive course environment.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 323: Modern English Grammar

A course focused on the development and grammar of modern English. The course includes coverage of the history of the language with special attention to grammatical development, as well as coverage of modern grammar and dialect differences.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 325: Young Adult Literature

A study of literature written for adolescents, including an introduction to the genres, authors, and illustrators of adolescent and young adult literature. Special emphasis is given to criteria for analysis, evaluation, and selection of literature for use in the secondary classroom (grades 7- 12).

  • 3 credits

ENGL 333: World Literature

A study of outstanding writings in world literature with the aim of creating a deeper appreciation and compassion for people and their problems through the examples presented in the literature.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or instructor’s permission

  • 3 credits

ENGL 401: Practicum in Writing Instruction

Individual reading, training and practice in tutoring writing and administering a writing-tutoring program restricted to advanced students. The student administers the on-campus Writing Lab under the direction of a faculty member.

Activities include readings on writing-center programs, experiential learning in training and supervising tutors, experiential learning in program assessment.

  • 1-3 credits
  • May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 421: Shakespeare

A brief study of the English Renaissance under Queen Elizabeth and a detailed study of some of Shakespeare’s representative plays.

Prerequisites: 6 hours of English at the 200 level or above

  • 3 credits

ENTR 209: Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course prepares business and non-business majors to start and manage their own business by equipping them with knowledge and skill in the areas of assessing business opportunities, writing business plans, choosing business structures, meeting legal requirements, securing business capital, creating marketing plans, establishing accounting practices, and managing business growth.

  • 3 credits
  • $10 fee

FAHS 231: Perspectives on Singleness & Marriage

A study of proper relationships for the single adult, the dating or engaged couple, and the first years of marriage. Scriptural perspectives are emphasized.

  • 3 credits

FAHS 331: Perspectives on the Family

The study of the family. Topics covered will include the history of parenting, family systems and approaches to parenting, parental influences, parenting
through the life stages, and contemporary issues of parenting including: foster parenting, adoption, single parents, blended families, and adolescent mothers. Family strengths, as well as families at risk, will be evaluated.

  • 3 credits

GREK 223: Koine Greek IA

A course designed to give the student an acquaintance with the basic forms and structure of Koine Greek in which the New Testament was written. Emphasis is placed upon grammar, vocabulary, and translation for the purpose of making Greek a valuable preaching/teaching tool. The student will be automatically charged for BibleWorks and will learn to use it for translation evaluation, lexical studies, and textual criticism.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 224: Koine Greek IB

A course designed to give the student an acquaintance with the basic forms and structure of Koine Greek in which the New Testament was written. Emphasis is placed upon grammar, vocabulary, and translation for the purpose of making Greek a valuable preaching/teaching tool.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 223

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 323: Koine Greek IIA

Particular attention is given to New Testament Greek syntax (uses of participles, infinitives, cases, moods, the article) as it relates to exegesis for the purpose of making practical application to teaching and preaching ministries. Students are introduced to linguistics and its implications for Biblical interpretation, particularly in the area of word studies and exegetical analysis. Some translation work is done.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 224

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 324: Koine Greek IIB

Particular attention is given to New Testament Greek syntax (uses of participles, infinitives, cases, moods, the article) as it relates to exegesis for the purpose of making practical application to teaching and preaching ministries. Students are introduced to linguistics and its implications for Biblical interpretation, particularly in the area of word studies and exegetical analysis. Some translation work is done.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 323

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 423: Koine Greek IIIA

A course in which students translate a Pauline Epistle giving special attention to syntactical constructions and structure. Students are introduced to the rudiments of NT Textual Criticism and continue to develop their understanding of lexical and syntactical semantics and pragmatics

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 324

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

GREK 424: Koine Greek IIIB

A course in which students translate a Pauline Epistle giving special attention to syntactical constructions and structure. Students are introduced to the rudiments of NT Textual Criticism and continue to develop their understanding of lexical and syntactical semantics and pragmatics.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: GREK 423

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HBRW 233: Classical Hebrew IA

An introduction to Hebrew morphology, syntax, vocabulary, and pronunciation. The best tools are introduced to facilitate exegesis and exposition of Hebrew prose, making Hebrew accessible to a pastoral or teaching ministry. The student will learn to use BibleWorks for translation evaluation and lexical studies.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HBRW 234: Classical Hebrew IB

An introduction to Hebrew morphology, syntax, vocabulary, and pronunciation. The best tools are introduced to facilitate exegesis and exposition of Hebrew prose, making Hebrew accessible to a pastoral or teaching ministry. The student will learn to use BibleWorks for translation evaluation and lexical studies.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: HBRE 233

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HBRW 333: Classical Hebrew IIA

An intermediate level study of Hebrew syntax and exegesis. Students will translate selected portions from the Minor Prophets and OT narratives.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses

Prerequisite: Hebrew 234

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HBRW 334: Classical Hebrew IIB

An intermediate level study of Hebrew syntax and exegesis. Students will translate selected portions from the Minor Prophets and OT narratives.

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses.

Prerequisite: Hebrew 333

  • 3 credits
  • $289 material fee (a one-time fee that covers all the Greek and Hebrew classes)

HIST 102: Historical Foundation of Missions

This course takes a biographical approach to the study of the history of the Christian mission from the early church to the present. Special emphasis is given to the modern missionary era beginning in 1792. The course seeks to evaluate and learn from the lives and strategies of great missionaries who have established Christianity as the global faith it is today.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as MISS 102.

HIST 121: Western Civilization to 1800

Survey of the ideals, institutions, and persons in the growth of European civilization from antiquity to 1800 with attention given to the roles played by Asian and African cultures in shaping the Western world.

  • 3 credits

HIST 122: Modern European History, 1800-Present

Explores the cultural, social, political, and economic evolution of European civilization from the French Revolution to the present.

  • 3 credits

HIST 221: United States History to 1865

A survey of American history from the colonial era through the Civil War. Emphasis on the American Revolution, the Early Republic, and the coming of the Civil War.

  • 3 credits

HIST 222: United States History since 1865

A survey of American history from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis on emancipation and Reconstruction, the Progressive Era, both world wars, the Civil Rights Movement, and the rise of conservatism.

  • 3 credits

HIST 323: Church History

A survey of the origins and development of the Christian church from its establishment to the present. This will include study of the doctrine, policy, and spirituality of the ancient and undivided church; Medieval Christianity in both continuity and change; the Reformation and the growth of Protestantism; denominational organization and division; the Evangelical Revival; the modern missionary movement; and Christian work and witness in contemporary culture.

  • 3 credits

HIST 433: Early Methodism and the American Holiness Movement

A historical survey of the origins of the Methodist movements in England and the U.S with special attention to their key figures and contemporary literature. Also explores the development of the American holiness revival in the mid-19th century and its aftermath, including the origin and development of the Conservative Holiness Movement.

  • 3 credits

INCS 101: College Success

A practical course designed to assist students in the transition into college life. The primary focus will be on developing necessary study skills, including note taking, close and critical reading, test-taking strategies and in-class writing techniques. Assignments will integrate students’ other coursework, allowing students to put skills to immediate practical use.

Only students with 30 or fewer hours at GBSC may enroll.

  • 1 credit
  • $50 course fee

INFL 101: Information Literacy

This course introduces students to the various ways in which information is organized and stored and to the process of finding, using, and distributing information across various formats. Students acquire experience with resources available online and in print while learning to evaluate the quality of information, use information ethically, and feel comfortable in a rapidly changing information ecology.

  • 0 credits
  • $6 materials fee

INTS 499: Experiential Learning

This course provides students with real world experience in a setting consistent with their academic plan, original research in their field of specialization, or a significant project in their specialty area.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of instructor.

  • 3 credits
  • May be repeated for credit.

LEAD 100: Professional Studies Leadership Organization

Symposia of all students in the Division of Professional Studies, generally held monthly. These meetings focus on personal development, leadership development, and divisional organization and activities.

  • 0 credits

LEAD 121: Introduction to Church and Family Leadership

A study of leadership principles tailored to church and family, providing a unifying foundation for study in various concentrations.

  • 2 credits

LEAD 226: Leadership Seminar

This course is uniquely designed to be a study of leadership that is both biblically supported and highly practical in developing one’s leadership ability. Utilizing J. Oswald Sanders book, Spiritual Leadership, along with the readings of I & II Timothy and Titus and an in-depth study of the leadership principles from the life of Nehemiah, the student will become anchored in a biblical model of leadership. This course will also utilize John Maxwell’s classic book, The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, to provide the foundation for understanding leadership principles that are essential to successful leadership in today’s world.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as MNED 226.

LEAD 405: Leadership and Meeting Management Skills

Class is divided into two sections: (1) Leadership Skills, and (2) Meeting Management. The student learns administrative and leadership principles that will equip him for effective ministry. Conflict management techniques and interpersonal relationship skills are developed. The student learns how to chair orderly board meetings and conference business meetings.

  • 1 credit
  • Same as MNED 405.

LEAD 425: Leading Change and Managing Conflict

This course is designed to help students hone their human relation skills and learn how to influence others. Special attention is giving to leading change within an organization and dealing with the conflicts that occur in that process.

  • 3 credits

MATH 101: College Algebra

Basic concepts of algebra, including real numbers, linear equations, polynomials, factoring, rational algebraic expressions, irrational equations, exponents and radicals, logarithmic and exponential functions, graphs of equations, quadratic equations, logarithmic and exponential functions.

Prerequisite: High school Algebra 1 and 2, or permission of instructor

  • 3 credits

MATH 122: Statistics

Measures of central tendency and variability, probability, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and introduction to nonparametric techniques.

  • 3 credits

MATH 213: Math Concepts and Applications

Covers a variety of topics in math which may vary but generally are chosen from areas such as problem solving, algebra review, elementary statistics and probability, consumer math, voting methods, finance, number sense, geometry, and graph theory.

  • 3 credits

MISS 102: Historical Foundation of Missions

This course takes a biographical approach to the study of the history of the Christian mission from the early church to the present. Special emphasis is given to the modern missionary era beginning in 1792. The course seeks to evaluate and learn from the lives and strategies of great missionaries who have established Christianity as the global faith it is today.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as HIST 102.

MISS 227: Theology of the Christian World Mission

An investigation into the scriptural and theological understanding of the world mission of the church. Consideration will be given to the biblical data on missions in general, and the missionary mandate in particular, as well as the place of spiritual dynamics in its fulfillment.

Issues such as the uniqueness of Christ and the state of those who have never heard will be discussed. The student will be exposed to philosophical arguments for the Christian mission.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as THEO 227.

MISS 235: Field Studies in Missions

With approval of the Divisional Chair, short-term mission trips can be taken for elective missions credit beyond the required missions internship. This will include academic work as well as the requirements of the trip itself.

  • 1-3 credits

MISS 322: Current Issues and Methods in Missions

A study of contemporary issues and trends in missiological thought and practice. Modern methods of missionary work will be surveyed and will be evaluated in light of biblical practices and the history of missions. Consideration is given to strengths and weaknesses of traditional and more recent methods.

  • 2 credits

MISS 328: Principles and Problems of Missionary Life

A course on the principles and practicalities of missionary preparation, life and work. Problematic areas such as fund-raising, cross-cultural stress, field deprivations, language acquisition, worker conflicts, and power encounters will be covered. Ways to maintain spiritual, physical, emotional, and family wholeness will be considered.

  • 3 credits

MISS 421: Cultural Diversity

A course designed to help the student develop a deeper appreciation for and a positive attitude toward other world cultures and civilizations. It presents the approach Christianity should take in relation to other cultures, and the similarities and differences of these cultures with Christianity.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as SOCI 421.

MISS 432: Missions Internship

A course in which the student observes, experiences, and participates in life and work on the mission field under the supervision of a qualified missionary or national. An interactive journal is submitted at the end of the field experience. There will be other academic work.

  • 2 credits

MISS 436: Senior ISWM Seminar

A seminar for all seniors in the Intercultural Studies and World Missions department. The course will include final preparation of the student’s portfolio, various outcomes testing, and planning for future involvement in ministry.

  • 1 credit

MISS 440: Topics in Missiology

A course that provides opportunity for learning, research, and evaluation in a specialized area of missions study. If done independently, the topic must be approved by the Divisional Chair. On the transcript, such a class will also carry the topic studied during the specific offering, for example Topics in Missiology: Introduction to Muslim Evangelism, or Urban Mission Ministry.

  • 1-3 credits

MISS 451: Urban Mission Ministry

A course that focuses on Christian mission and ministry in the world’s growing cities. The biblical basis for urban ministry is presented and effective case studies are presented.

  • 1-3 credits
  • Same as MNED 451.

MNED 103: Ministerial Plenary Session

This Friday session provides students opportunity to be mentored collectively, to benefit from spiritual accountability, and to hear special lectures. During these sessions they will also be exposed to a variety of ministries and ministers from a variety of denominational backgrounds, as well ministry opportunities.

Required for all students in enrolled degrees offered through the Ministerial Education Division.

  • 0 credits
  • two semesters
  • $30 lab fee

MNED 104: Fundamentals of Biblical Communication

An introduction to the study of effective sermon and Sunday School lesson preparation and delivery. Attention will be given to the personal spiritual development of the beginning preacher/teacher as well as his/her development as a professional.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as COMM 104.

MNED 105: Spiritual Formation and Soul Winning

Developing Personal Godliness. The focus of this unit of study is to learn how to become committed, faithful, and consistent men and women of God. The student is given practical guidelines that will help gain the spiritual disciplines necessary for personal godliness.

Soul Winning. In this unit of study, the student masters at least one plan for leading a person to the Lord. The student is required to begin sharing the Gospel with the unsaved and attempting to lead them to Christ.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as THEO 105.

MNED 106: Church Educational Program

This course focuses on equipping the student, using The 7 Laws of the Learner, to participate effectively in the local church’s Sunday School and/or Junior Church programs. The student also learns methods for teaching the Bible throughout the Church’s educational program.

  • 1 credit

MNED 200: Advanced Homiletics

Consideration is given to the finer aspects of sermon preparation and delivery. Attention is given to the continuation of the personal spiritual development of the preacher as well as his /her development as a public speaker

The materials fee provides students with BibleWorks software, which is required for Greek, Hebrew and Advanced Homiletics courses; students are charged the fee only once.

Prerequisite: MNED 104

  • 3 hours one semester
  • $289 material fee

MNED 206: Expository Preaching

An examination of the techniques of expository preaching. Special emphasis is placed upon the proper and efficient use of research tools for expository sermons.

Prerequisite: MNED 200

  • 3 credits

MNED 225: Leading Open Air Outreach

This course trains students to present evangelistic messages in the “open air” using a sketch board and/or other methods, including the “Prayer Station.” From the classroom lectures, students learn principles of effective open air evangelism.

Much of the training time is spent on the streets where students participate in children’s meetings or meetings for adults, applying what they learned on campus.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

MNED 226: Leadership Seminar

This course is uniquely designed to be a study of leadership that is both biblically supported and highly practical in developing one’s leadership ability. Utilizing J. Oswald Sanders book, Spiritual Leadership, along with the readings of I & II Timothy and Titus and an in-depth study of the leadership principles from the life of Nehemiah, the student will become anchored in a biblical model of leadership. This course will also utilize John Maxwell’s classic book, The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, to provide the foundation for understanding leadership principles that are essential to successful leadership in today’s world.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as LEAD 226.

MNED 227: The Minister and Finance

This course trains ministerial students in the fundamentals of personal, ministerial, and church finances, including budgeting, basic accounting methods and software, taxes, business relationships within the church, and church building projects.

  • 1 credit

MNED 228: Ministerial Ethics

This course introduces ministerial students to the key ethical issues associated with pastoring, including personal and professional integrity, relations with the opposite sex, confidentiality, home visitation and calling, time use as a full-time minister, use of church property, and relationships to church authority structures.

  • 1 credit

MNED 235: Pastoral Counseling

A practical course designed to provide a Biblical foundation for pastoral counseling including a theology of counseling, core qualities in the role model of Jesus Christ, and the dynamic resources of the Word of God and the Holy Spirit. This course also includes an emphasis on the importance of spiritual care that is uniquely embedded in pastoral ministry.

  • 3 credits

MNED 303: Preaching Holiness

The preparation and delivery of expository messages on the doctrine of entire sanctification. This class focuses on developing the student’s ability to exegete and articulate this doctrine in sermon form.

Prerequisite: MNED 206

  • 2 credits

MNED 305: Conducting Sacred Ceremonies

Class is divided into two sections: (1) Baptism and Communion – the biblical and historical importance of baptism and communion and how to baptize new converts and how to conduct a communion service; and (2) Weddings and Funerals – how to biblically counsel with people who desire to be married and how to conduct a wedding; how to comfort people who have lost a loved one and how to conduct a funeral.

  • 1 credit

MNED 331: Introduction to Youth Ministry

An introduction to the concepts of ministry to the teen cultures of our world. A central objective of the course is the development of a written theology, philosophy, mission, and strategy of youth ministry. Viewing the Basic Youth Seminar is a requirement for successful completion of this course.

  • 2 credits
  • $20 fee

MNED 332: Contemporary Youth Issues

Study of crucial issues facing today’s teenager, including such problems as peer pressure, friendship, dating, sexual promiscuity, music, drugs, and drinking. Key to this course is developing practical, biblical strategies for helping youth know how to handle these issues in a way consistent with loving God and others.

  • 2 credits
  • $20 fee

MNED 341: Advanced Evangelism and Discipleship Skills

The students will further develop their skills in evangelism and discipling new believers. Interpersonal skills will also be developed. Part of the class will be devoted to gaining supervised ministry experience.

Prerequisite: THEO 226

  • 2 credits

MNED 342: Urban Small Group Discipleship and Mentoring

The students will gain proficiency at discipling new believers in an urban environment. The goal of the class is for the students to establish a small group of seekers and new believers, and to find people to mentor as a potential small group leader. The students will work in the city under the supervision of a coach.

Prerequisite: MNED 341

  • 2 credits

MNED 343: Contemporary Approaches to Urban Ministry

In this hands-on course, which blends participation in ministry with classroom instruction, the particular challenges and opportunities of city ministry will be examined. Contemporary approaches to relief work, community development, and racial reconciliation will be observed during a week-long block session.

The class will examine approaches to church outreach/evangelism and urban church planting. The student will move toward constructing a biblical, personal, and contextual philosophy of ministry for the modern urban environment.

  • 2 credits

MNED 404: Pastoral Teaching Practicum

The preparation and presentation of exegetical, Bible-focused lessons designed to engage the student’s mind with the text and guide them to practical application of the truth to their lives.

Prerequisite: MNED 206

  • 3 credits

MNED 405: Leadership and Meeting Management Skills

Class is divided into two sections: (1) Leadership Skills, and (2) Meeting Management. The student learns administrative and leadership principles that will equip him or her for effective ministry. Conflict management techniques and interpersonal relationship skills are developed. The student learns how to chair orderly board meetings and conference business meetings.

  • 1 credit
  • Same as LEAD 405.

MNED 406: Church Growth

The student studies the methods and dynamics of growing churches. Emphasis is placed on learning how to motivate effectively and lead a congregation into becoming a soul-winning, nurturing church.

  • 1 credit

MNED 407: Church Administration and Civil Law

The student is exposed to administrative principles and practices of church administration, focusing primarily on record keeping, including maintenance of church rolls, bylaws, background checks, board meeting and church business meeting minutes.

The church’s relation to the state in also addressed, including how to determine state-specific laws touching churches and clergy, avoiding civil lawsuits, dealing with allegations of child abuse and/or molestation.

  • 1 credit

MNED 420: Ministerial Internship

A course in which the student observes, experiences, and participates in the various pastoral ministries of a church under the supervision of an approved pastor. Includes academic work, preaching, teaching, and other church-related ministries.

  • 3 credits
  • $150 course fee

MNED 432: The Youth Pastor and Program

The essential characteristics of the effective youth pastor, building on the foundational truths of I Timothy 4:12 and emphasizing the necessity that the youth pastor be a godly person. Includes guidelines for relationship to the pastor, to the church leadership, to parents, to the congregation, and to the young people.

Course also addresses principles for the effective organization, administration, and implementation of youth programs in the local church setting.

Prerequisite: MNED 331

  • 2 credits

MNED 441: Urban Church Planting

In this advanced class, students learn the legal and social issues involved in planting a church in the inner city. Spending part of the time in the classroom and part of the time in urban ministry experiences, the students will attempt to build on their work from the previous year and to actually help develop an existing church or plant a new one. A coach involved in inner city ministry will supervise this activity.

Prerequisite: THEO 226

  • 2 credits

MNED 442: Leadership in Urban Ministry

Through guided readings, discussion, and supervised experience in the urban setting, students learn and apply additional leadership skills in their attempt to solidify their ministry work of the previous three semesters. A retreat designed to help students reflect on personal and ministry goals is included in this course.

Prerequisite: MNED 441

  • 2 credits

MNED 451: Urban Mission Ministry

A course that focuses on Christian mission and ministry in the world’s growing cities. The biblical basis for urban ministry is presented and effective case studies are presented.

  • 1-3 credits
  • Same as MISS 451.

MNGM 243: Introduction to Human Resource Management

This course presents the fundamental principles and introduces the functional areas of human resource management. Particular emphasis is given to the integral nature of the human resource management function and its growing strategic importance in today’s workplace. Topics include compensation and benefits, employee health and safety, staffing, training and development, organizational and diversity management, corporate culture, and employee relations. A focus on the development of essential skills for “people management” make this course applicable to any who are, or seek to be, in a management position.

  • 3 credits

MNGM 253: Fundamentals of Management and Supervision

Overview of management discipline as a process involving planning, organizing, controlling, and directing as they relate to personnel supervision. An integrated view of management including organizational behavior is emphasized.

  • 3 credits

MRKT 263: Fundamentals of Marketing

A study of the complex and dynamic activities of marketing functions, explaining the roles of marketing in society and the institutions that compose the marketing system. Focuses on the marketing mix: product development and differentiation, distribution channels, pricing, and promotion, as well as an introduction to buyer behavior and marketing research.

  • 3 credits

MUED 268: Introduction to Music Education

An introductory course in Music Education that concentrates on the role and function of music education and music teachers. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 101

  • 2 credits

MUED 381: General Music: Early Childhood and Elementary

A study of the various methods and materials used in teaching early childhood and elementary students including curriculum design with national and state music standards as well as performing, responding and creative assessments. Course experiences are highly participatory to facilitate improvement of musical and pedagogical skills. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 101, MUSC 268 or permission of instructor

  • 2 credit
  • $20 materials fee

MUED 382: General Music: Middle School

A study of the various methods and materials used in teaching middle school students including curriculum design with national and state music standards as well as performing, responding and creative assessments. Course experiences are highly participatory to facilitate improvement of musical and pedagogical skills. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 381 or permission of instructor

  • 1 credit

MUED 383: General Music: Secondary

A study of the various methods and materials used in teaching secondary students including curriculum design with national and state music standards as well as performing, responding and creative assessments. Course experiences are highly participatory to facilitate improvement of musical and pedagogical skills. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 381 or permission of instructor

  • 1 credit

MUED 384: Introduction to Technology in Music Education

An overview of current technologies as they relate to music education. Topics include computer and internet awareness, productivity software, MIDI sequencing, an introduction to digital audio recording and editing, notation software, and computer-assisted instruction. Applications include Microsoft Office Suite, Audacity, Logic, SmartMusic, Finale and Smart Board Technology.

Prerequisite: MUSC 102

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

MUED 385: Classroom Instruments in Music Education

This course provides students opportunities to become familiar with instruments utilized in the General Music classroom, including but not limited to the Orff Instrumentarium, pitched and unpitched hand-held percussion, various ethnic drums, guitar, and recorder. Elementary and Secondary general music classroom preparation with an emphasis on composition and improvisation with instruments commonly utilized general music classrooms.

  • 2 credits

MUED 387: Percussion Techniques

An introduction to the techniques of playing percussion instruments. Emphasis is placed on tympani, snare drum, and mallet instruments. Observation required.

  • 1 credit
  • 1⁄2 semester

MUED 388: Brass Techniques

An introduction to the techniques of playing brass instruments. The trumpet, french horn, baritone, trombone, and tuba are equally emphasized. Observation required.

  • 1 credit
  • 1⁄2 semester

MUED 389: Woodwind Techniques

An introduction to the technique of playing woodwind instruments. Emphasis is placed on fingering and embouchure. Observation required.

  • 1 credit
  • 1⁄2 semester

MUED 390: String Techniques

An introduction to the techniques of playing string instruments. Violin, viola, cello, and double bass are emphasized. Observation required.

  • 1 credit
  • 1⁄2 semester

MUED 482: Marching Band Techniques

An introduction to the fundamental principles of effective instruction with respect to the contemporary marching band. Opportunities to practice applying these skills in learning how to prepare, organize, teach, and rehearse this type of ensemble are embedded in the course. Observation required.

  • 2 credits

MUED 483: Instrumental Methods

The teaching of elementary and secondary instrumental music. Includes tools for the foundation and organization of beginning and advanced band programs; literature selection; rehearsal techniques; goals, program objectives, student perception and performance; classroom management; clinical experience. Observation required.

  • 2 credits

MUED 495: Early Field Experience

A practicum course designed as realistic training in music teaching through observation, pedagogy, lesson planning, curriculum design, assessment, and teaching in a variety of school settings. Future music teachers learn by observing practicing teachers in the field. Additional instruction will be provided through lecture and reflection on assigned readings. Observation required.

  • 0 credit

MUED 496: Practicum in Music Education I

A senior-level course designed to precede the student teaching experience. This course includes classroom observations with assigned mentor outstanding teachers, as well as seminar presentations considerations in the area of instructional planning, lesson presentation skills, interpersonal communication skills, and evaluation techniques. Observation required.

  • 0 credit

MUED 497: Practicum in Music Education II

A senior-level practicum course that deals with the practices and challenges of student teaching. It is taken alongside the student teaching experience.
Students participate in class discussion, write case studies, and progress reports relating to the students in his/her teaching class and take part in student assessment under the supervision of a mentor cooperating teacher.
The course also facilitates the completion of Music Credentials and Portfolio.

  • 0 credit

MUED 498: Supervised Student Teaching in Music

A supervised student teaching experience in which the student is required to observe and participate in a variety of elementary and secondary teaching experiences in a classroom under the assistance of an assigned mentor and the supervision of the Student Teaching Coordinator.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 9 credit

MUSC 101: Introduction to Music Fundamentals

A music fundamentals course designed for non-music majors and music majors who have little or no previous music theory training. Students who receive a B- or above on Music Theory Matriculation Examination I receive credit for the course.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 102: Basic Music Theory

A fundamental course in basic musicianship, sight singing, and ear training, designed for non-music majors and music majors who enter with a deficiency in the basic melodic and harmonic concepts of music. Students who receive a B- or above on Music Theory Matriculation Examination II will receive credit for the course.

Prerequisite: MUSC 101 Introduction to Music Fundamentals or credit for its corresponding matriculation examination

  • 3 credits

MUSC 103: Fine Arts Appreciation

A survey course introducing the student to art, architecture, and music from a Biblical worldview. This course seeks to enable students to gain a knowledgeable appreciation for and enjoyment of the arts. No prior knowledge of the arts is necessary for this non-performance course.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 104: Notation in Music Technology

Fundamentals of music writing including an overview of standard music notation programs for the computer, with emphasis on Finale.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

MUSC 111: Music Theory I

Studies in melody, rhythm, scale structure, and other theoretical concepts as related to the common practice period.

Prerequisite: MUSC 102 Basic Music Theory or credit for its corresponding matriculation examination

  • 3 credits

MUSC 111: Music Theory I Lab

Lab studies support Music Theory I curriculum and include studies in ear training including rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic dictation; and interval, scale, and chord identification.

Prerequisite: MUSC 102 Basic Music Theory or credit for its corresponding matriculation examination

  • 1 credits
  • $20 materials fee

MUSC 112: Music Theory II

Part-writing, analysis, and application of diatonic triads and seventh chords as related to the common practice period.

Prerequisite: MUSC 111

  • 3 credits

MUSC 112: Music Theory II Lab

Lab studies support Music Theory II curriculum and include studies in sight singing, solfége, and rhythmic reading. Application of functional keyboard skills.

Prerequisite: MUSC 111

  • 1 credits

MUSC 115: Applied Music

First-year applied study in voice, piano, wind and string instrument. Entry by placement audition only.

  • 1 credit
  • $160 applied music fee

MUSC 131: Music of the Bible

A survey of music in the Bible. Hebrew and Greek word studies in music specifically taken from the Bible. Emphasis on the current usefulness of what the Word of God specifically teaches concerning music.

  • 3 credits
  • Same course as BIST 131.

MUSC 133: Intro to Philosophy of Music

The philosophical and biblical basis for music in the church, the music classroom and the Christian home. A study and evaluation of philosophies, ancient to modern, historical implication and cultural associations in light of a Christo-centric philosophy of music.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 135: Church Music I: Foundations and Techniques

A survey of the role of music in worship, edification, evangelism, and missions in evangelical churches, including emphasis on the biblical foundations of Christian worship and ministry, and their implications for those who minister in music. Emphasis on selected techniques for music ministry, including methods for planning and leading worship, organization and leadership of music ministries for all age levels in the local church.

  • 3 credits

MUSC 136: Church Music II: Leadership and Administration

An overview of the use of music in the Christian Education program of the local church, including work with children and amateur musicians.

The course includes methods of planning, organizing, and developing a church music program with criteria for leadership development, cooperating staff relationships, service planning, music in ministry, congregational singing, the copyright law, and the church music library. Applications include MediaShout.

  • 3 credits

MUSC 170: Music Service Organization

Required attendance of music program students to all MSO meetings, designated recitals, music service opportunities and the completion of a portfolio check each semester.

  • 0 credit
  • $20 materials

MUSC 171: Ensemble

Select instrumental and vocal groups formed for public appearances. By audition only.

  • 1⁄2 credit

MUSC 172: Chamber Music

Introduction to basic instrumental and vocal chamber repertoire. Attention given to ensemble rehearsal techniques, tuning and style. Repertoire chosen to suit instrumental collection and voice types registered. Entry is limited to performance level study or permission by instructor. By audition only.

  • 1⁄2 credit
  • $10 materials fee

MUSC 173: Christmas/Oratorio Choir

An opportunity to sing in the annual GBSC Christmas Program in the fall semester and perform a variety of oratorios and standard choral literature in the spring semester. Open to a large number of students. Audition required.

  • 1⁄2 credit
  • $10 materials fee

MUSC 175: College Choir

An opportunity for a select group to perform a variety of repertoire and venues. Regular members are expected to travel. Audition required.

  • 1⁄2 credit
  • $10 materials fee

MUSC 177: Symphonic Wind and String Ensemble

An opportunity for a select group of instrumentalists to perform a variety of repertoire and venues. Regular members are expected to travel. Audition Required.

  • 1⁄2 credit
  • $10 materials fee

MUSC 181, MUSC 182, MUSC 281, MUSC 282: Accompanying

Experiences in accompanying vocalists, instrumentalists, ensembles, and choirs.

Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MUSC 351 or MUSC 261 in Applied Piano

  • 0 credits

MUSC 183: Applied Diction for Singers

Principles of effective diction; use of the International Phonetic Alphabet and related resources; pronunciation rules for English, French, German, and Italian.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in applied music

  • 2 credits

MUSC 211: Music Theory III

Continued study of harmony from the common practice period and an introduction to borrowed, chromatic and secondary chords. Involves analytical principles, form, and part-writing application.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 3 credits

MUSC 211: Music Theory III Lab

Lab studies support Music Theory III curriculum and include more advanced studies in ear training, including solfége, rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic dictation and interval, scale, and chord identification.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 1 credits

MUSC 212: Music Theory IV

Continued study of harmony from the common practice period. Includes an introduction to atonal, serial, and Schenkarian analysis. Analytical principles, form, composition, and part-writing application are emphasized.

Prerequisite: MUSC 211

  • 3 credits

MUSC 212: Music Theory IV Lab

Lab studies support Music Theory IV curriculum and include more advanced studies in sight singing, solfége, and rhythmic reading. Application of more harmonic concepts at the keyboard.

Prerequisite: MUSC 211

  • 1 credits

MUSC 215: Applied Music

Second-year applied study in voice, piano, wind and string instrument. Entry by placement audition only.

  • 1 credits
  • $160 applied music fee

MUSC 221: Music History and Literature I

Music in western civilization traced from antiquity, Middle Ages through the Renaissance.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 2 credits

MUSC 222: Music History and Literature II

Music in western civilization from the Baroque to the early Classical Period.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 2 credits

MUSC 231: Hymnology

A study of hymns, a historical survey of the development of hymnody, and consideration of the use of hymns in Christian worship. Hymns representative of various periods and styles are sung, analyzed, and discussed in class.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 283: Seminar in Piano Literature: Keybard Music 1600-1828

An in-depth look at selected composers and keyboard compositions of the late Baroque and Classical periods (from the English Virginalists to the death of Schubert). Elements of musical style, keyboard writing, favored genres, and performance practice will be included in the discussions. Reading and listening assignments will supplement the in-class presentations by faculty and students.

  • 2 credit hours

MUSC 284: Piano Pedagogy and Literature I

This course is designed to introduce pianists to the art of teaching, the piano mechanism, historical methods and pedagogues, and the learning process through discussions, lectures, and assignments, which explore teaching techniques, materials and methods, appropriate for the beginning and elementary piano student. Students will be given opportunities for practice teaching and observation in both private and group settings in order to gain practical experience. Observation required.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 2 credit hours
  • $25 lab fee

MUSC 285: Methods of Music Program Production

A practical study of how to produce the technical aspects of a church or school program. Experience in set construction, lighting, sound reinforcement, and program production.

  • 2 credits

MUSC 286: Seminar in Piano Literature: Keyboard Music 1828-Contemporary

An in-depth look at selected composers and keyboard compositions of the Romantic and Impressionistic periods, the 20th century and current trends (post-Schubert – current trends). Elements of musical style, keyboard writing, favored genres, and performance practice will be included in the discussions. Reading and listening assignments will supplement the in-class presentations by faculty and students.

  • 2 Credits

MUSC 315: Applied Music

Third-year applied study in voice, piano, wind and string instrument. Entry by placement audition only.

  • 1-2 credits
  • $160 applied music fee

MUSC 321: Music History and Literature III

Continued study of Classicism through early Romanticism.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 2 credits

MUSC 322: Music History and Literature IV

Continued study from late Romanticism to the present.

Prerequisite: MUSC 112

  • 2 credits

MUSC 370: Half Recital

A public recital of approximately 25 minutes.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in applied music and consent of instructor

  • 0 credits

MUSC 384: Piano Pedagogy and Literature II

This course in piano pedagogy is designed to provide an in-depth study of materials, repertoire, musical and technical development, and curriculum planning for the intermediate/advanced pre-college student. Independent studio management and planning are core components of the course. Students will be given opportunities for practice teaching and observation in both private and group settings in order to gain practical experience, to learn the art of conducting master classes and adjudicating competitions.

Prerequisite: Piano Pedagogy I

  • 2 credit hours
  • $25 lab fee

MUSC 385: Conducting Techniques I

Fundamentals of conducting to enable students to direct choral groups in educational and church settings. Methods of rehearsal and performance conducting. Observation required.

Prerequisite: MUSC 102 or permission of instructor

  • 2 credits

MUSC 386: Conducting Techniques II

Sight-reading of scores, score study and harmonic analysis, baton technique, in-depth rehearsal and performance conducting, and conducting technique for choral and instrumental groups. Observation required.

Prerequisites: MUSC 112, MUSC 385

  • 2 credits

MUSC 415: Applied Music

Fourth-year and continued applied study in voice, piano, wind and string instrument. Entry by placement audition only.

  • 1-2 credits
  • $160 applied music fee

MUSC 470: Senior Recital

A public solo recital of approximately 50 minutes.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in MUSC 461 or MUSC 462 and consent of instructor

  • 0 credit

MUSC 481: Choral Methods

This is a survey course designed to help music educators gain tools for teaching secondary choral music and to equip church ministers to effectively build and maintain a church choral program . Topics to be explored will include choral literature appropriate for a variety of levels and learning styles, methodology involving sight-reading and strengthening musicianship, building a choral program, rehearsal techniques, and issues pertaining to the development of a choral ensemble. Observation required.

Prerequisites: MUSC 211, MUSC 386

  • 2 credits

MUSC 484: Piano Pedagogy Practicum

This practicum is a supervised field experience with assisgned students. Requirements include teaching weekly lessons (minimum: 14 lessons per semester); implementation of a studio policy and payment procedure; demonstration and knowledge of varying teaching methods and their implementation; and weekly meetings with course instructor. Continuity in teaching the same students over a period of consecutive semesters is encouraged.

Prerequisite: Piano Pedagogy and Literature I and II

  • 4 hours, two semesters

MUSC 485: Vocal Pedagogy and Literature

Pedagogy of Solo Voice. Fundamentals of voice production: posture, breath control, tone, diction. Includes a study of vocal repertoire. Observation required.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 2 credits

MUSC 486: String Pedagogy and Literature

Orientation course in methods of teaching string instruments. This course is designed to give specific training to string players in private and group pedagogical techniques and literature. Observation required.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • 2 credits

MUSC 491: Choral Conducting Practicum

Practical experience in score preparation, rehearsal planning, conducting. Observation required.

Prerequisites: MUSC 211, MUSC 481, permission of instructor

  • 1 credit

MUSC 492: Instrumental Conducting Practicum

Practical experience in score preparation, rehearsal planning, and conducting. Observation required.

Prerequisites: MUSC 212, 387, 388, 389, 390, permission of instructor

  • 1 credit

MUSC 494: Practicum in Church Music I

A senior-level course designed to precede the church music ministry experience. This course includes church observations in a variety of settings, as well as seminar considerations in the area of worship planning, presentation skills, interpersonal communication skills, and leadership techniques.

  • 0 credits

MUSC 495: Practicum in Church Music II

A senior-level course that equips students for the practices and challenges of church music ministry. It is taken alongside the church music ministry experience. Students participate in class discussion, write case studies, and progress reports relating to the students in his/her assigned ministry field experience and take part in student assessment under the supervision of a cooperating pastor, music minister. The course also facilitates the completion of Divisional Credentials and Portfolio.

  • 0 credits

MUSC 496: Supervised Church Music Ministry

A supervised church field experience in which the student is required to observe and participate in a variety of music ministry experiences under the assistance of a pastor/music minister and the supervision of the Church Music Ministry Coordinator.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

  • 2, 5 credits

PHIL 202: Introduction to Ethics

A study of ethical principles based upon the Word of God which is also used to critique major non-Christian ethical systems. Ethical principles are applied to various contemporary problems.

  • 3 credits

PHIL 221: Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to the principles of philosophy with emphasis on helping the student develop practical critical-thinking habits.

  • 3 credits

PHIL 225: Apologetics

A study of the Christian worldview. Particular emphasis is given to the reasonableness of the Christian faith and to the fact that there is sufficient evidence to support that belief. The Bible is examined in relation to its reliability and authority.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as THEO 225.

PHIL 235: Creation Apologetics

This course involves participating in a 12-week online learning experience with Answers in Genesis, plus doing other readings/activities related to apologetics. The course will provide a firm foundation in the fundamental ideas of creation apologetics.

Topics covered include: the nature of Noah’s flood, implications of death before sin, mutations and evolution, using logic to defend your faith, and a general argument for Christianity. At appropriate points in the course, some important concepts in biology and geology will be studied.

  • 3 credits
  • $35 materials fee (Answers in Genesis fee for online module)

PHIL 325: Logic, Argument and Debate

This course surveys traditional logic, especially classical logic. The course intends to help students understand the structure of different kinds of arguments, understand the features of traditional logic, better develop the ability to think critically, better learn formal and informal logical fallacies, and better learn how to resolve a variety of disagreements. A series of DVDs may be used to facilitate the class.

  • 2 credits
  • $40 materials fee

PHIL 335: Evangelistic Apologetics

This course meets with Evangelism in the Urban Community once per week, but has a distinct set of requirements. For part of the course, students will engage with philosophically-minded skeptics at philosophy meet-up groups (or place themselves in similar situations).

Apologetic debating/discussion skills and human relation skills will be developed during this course.

  • 2 credits

PHYS 111: Introduction to Physics

A course on the fundamentals of physics. Course topics include laboratory procedures, the controlled experiment, methods of measurement, data collection and analysis techniques, and interpreting experimental results.

  • 3 credits

PHYS 111: Introduction to Physics LAB

This course is a laboratory for PHYS 111. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHYS 111.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

PHYS 112: Physics 1

A course on concepts and principles of physics. Topics include: kinematics, dynamics, statics, heat, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites: PHYS 111 or appropriate placement test score

  • 3 credits

PHYS 112: Physics 1 LAB

This course is a laboratory for PHYS 112. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHYS 112.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

PSYC 101: General Psychology

An introductory course that acquaints the student with the different domains of study that fall under the classification of psychology.

This course promotes a familiarity with the basic concepts and theories of each area and differentiates between the secular and Christian viewpoints. Some specific areas of study include the nervous system, personality, and styles of learning.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 224: Adolescent Psychology

A study of the psychological and physiological development of the adolescent and young adult. Attention is given to the biological changes of adolescents and the consequences in behavior. Social, emotional, and moral aspects of development are stressed.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 229: Human Development Across the Lifespan

This course provides a chronological overview of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the entire lifespan–from conception through death. It is the study of how and why people change over time or reasons they remain the same. The impact of ethnicity, culture, gender, and religion upon development is examined.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 232: Child Development

The physical, mental, social, emotional, and moral development of children at various stages is studied from the viewpoints of psychology and scripture.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 326: Educational Psychology

A course designed to study the relationship between psychology and education. Some areas of study include purposes of education, classroom dynamics, measurement and evaluation, individual differences, and adjustments.

  • 3 credits

PSYC 329: Abnormal Psychology

A study of the etiology and treatment of the major psychological disorders of childhood and adulthood. The course will review theories of the development of psychopathology and research utilized for the study of mental illness. Classification of disorders according to the current edition of the DSM will be reviewed, including assessment and diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. The course will also address ethical concerns related to the assessment and treatment of mental illness and the effect of culture and diversity on mental health.

Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology

  • 3 credits

RLED 121: Introduction to Church and Family Ministry

Based on Deuteronomy 6:5-6, this class is designed to teach the student key principles to weave the church and family together in such a way that both act as strong partners in the spiritual formation of children. Learning activities takes place within the classroom and within a church setting focusing on practical experience.

  • 3 credits

RLED 122: Church Ministries with Children

This course is designed to help the student develop appropriate age-level activities, workshops, and objectives for the religious education of children. Philosophies of church education of children are also included. Current social and political influences on children are also studied.

  • 3 credits

RLED 202: Children’s Ministry Practicum

A laboratory class using and visualizing some materials for children’s services and daily Vacation Bible Schools. Students create a 5 day Bible lesson program and actively participate in children’s services.

  • 3 credits
  • $45 lab fee

RLED 203: Teaching Doctrine in Children’s Ministry

Systematic study of basic Christian doctrines and how to teach them to children. Approach includes key Bible verses, catechism, stories, songs, and appropriate techniques for presenting doctrine on a child’s level of understanding.

  • 3 credits

RLED 204: Creative Bible Teaching

A class designed for learning style differences in students of all ages. The study and presentation of creative ways to engage learners through drama, hands-on participation, and discussion are covered in this class.

  • 3 credits

RLED 225: Open Air Sketchboard Ministry

This course trains students to present evangelistic messages in “open air” using a sketch-board. From the classroom lectures, students learn principles of effective open air evangelism.

Much of the training time is spent on the streets, where students participate in open air meetings, applying the principles and methods they learned on campus. Class size is limited to six students per track.

  • 1 credit
  • $45 lab fee

SOCI 202: Principles of Sociology

An introductory study of sociology. Factors underlying the formation and functioning of society, group life, social institution and processes will be considered. Additionally, various current social problems are analyzed.

  • 3 credits

SOCI 345: Culture and Society

A course designed to foster an understanding of the responsibilities and privileges of living in a multicultural community, nation, and world. Students will be taught to think critically about differences and similarities among human groups, to appreciate personally the risks and rewards of engaging others, and to understand the necessity for making the effort in the first place.

  • 2 credits

SOCI 421: Cultural Diversity

A course designed to help the student develop a deeper appreciation for and a positive attitude toward other world cultures and civilizations. It presents the approach Christianity should take in relation to other cultures, as well as their similarities and differences from Christian culture.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as MISS 421.

SOCI 480: Topics in Social Science

A topical course focused on some aspect of the social sciences, with content varying from semester to semester.

  • 1-6 credits
  • As topic varies, may be repeated for credit.

SPAN 101: Spanish IA

A study of the basic principles of Spanish grammar. Oral and written exercises are designed to give efficiency in the reading, writing, and speaking of the Spanish language along with cultural orientation. This course is designed for those with one year or less of Spanish.

  • 3 credits

SPAN 102: Spanish IB

A study of the basic principles of Spanish grammar. Oral and written exercises are designed to give efficiency in the reading, writing, and speaking of the Spanish language along with cultural orientation. This course is designed for those with one year or less of Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 101

  • 3 credits

SPAN 201: Spanish IIA

A continuation of the study of Spanish grammar with special emphasis on speaking and writing. Cultural aspects are included.

Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or permission of instructor

  • 3 credits

SPAN 202: Spanish IIB

A continuation of the study of Spanish grammar with special emphasis on speaking and writing. Cultural aspects are included.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201

  • 3 credits

THEO 105: Spiritual Formation and Personal Evangelism

Developing Personal Godliness: The focus of this unit of study is to learn how to become committed, faithful, and consistent men and women of God. The student is given practical guidelines that will help gain the spiritual disciplines necessary for personal godliness

Personal Evangelism: In this unit of study, the student masters at least one plan for leading a person to the Lord. The student is required to begin sharing the Gospel with the unsaved and attempting to lead them to Christ.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as MNED 105.

THEO 112: Doctrine and Practice of Evangelism

This course will survey pertinent biblical, theological, and historical materials as well as techniques and methods used in personal faith-sharing. Through classroom and field experiences, students will discover their own style of, and develop skill for, one-on- one evangelism.

  • 1 credit

THEO 113: Doctrine and Practice of Church Growth

An investigation into the principles and practices of growing churches. Emphasis is placed upon spiritual health which leads to spiritual maturity and numerical growth. Practices which are both biblically sound and culturally relevant will be stressed.

  • 1 credit

THEO 114: Doctrine and Practice of World Missions

An introduction to missiology from a biblical, historical, methodological, and contemporary development viewpoint. An inquiry into the methods by which the missionary program of the local church can be improved and organized effectively for its missionary task.

  • 1 credit

THEO 115: Doctrine and Practice of Prayer

An examination of the biblical and theological basis of prayer. Class activities are structured to assist students in establishing a meaningful and effective personal prayer life.

  • 1 credit

THEO 134: Introduction to Christian Worship

A study of the theological foundations of Christian worship. The course centers upon the nature of God and resulting implications for worship. To a lesser degree, application of the course content is studied.

  • 2 credits

THEO 140: Principles of the Christian Life I

A Bible-based study of the authority, nature, and principles of the Christian life. This includes discussion of what it means to love God and others, and how loving God and others relates to all the lifestyle issues Christians face, such as entertainment, separation from the world, and interfacing with secular culture.

  • 2 credits

THEO 141: Principles of the Christian Life II

A study of loving God and others relates to responding to believers when they sin against us, gender and sexual identity issues, modesty, adornment, alcohol use, God’s design for reflecting his headship in corporate worship (1 Cor. 11:2-16), and the meaning and morality of music.

Prerequisite for THEO 140

  • 2 credits

THEO 201: Christian Beliefs

A study of the fundamental doctrines of the Christian faith. It involves a study of God the Father (theology), Jesus Christ (Christology), the Holy Spirit (pneumatology), man (anthropology), salvation (soteriology), and living the Christian life. Emphasis is on the best Scriptural references to establish the basic truth about each of these areas. Each study is life-related and integrated with daily Christian living rather than simply “concept” oriented.

  • 3 credits

THEO 202: Doctrine of Holiness

A study of the key passages that teach entire sanctification to be a second definite work of grace in the heart of the believer. The distinction between entire sanctification (heart purity) and subsequent growth in grace (maturity) is emphasized.

  • 3 credits

THEO 204: Religions of America

A study of the distinctive doctrines and practices of the major sects and cults started in America. A special emphasis is on strategies for effectively sharing truth with the cultist.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as CREL 204.

THEO 225: Apologetics

A study of the Christian worldview. Particular emphasis is given to the reasonableness of the Christian faith and to the fact that there is sufficient evidence to support that belief. The Bible is examined in relation to its reliability and authority.

  • 3 credits
  • Same as PHIL 225.

THEO 226: Discipleship and Small Groups

Theological and practical instruction on how to nurture and establish new converts in the faith. Students will learn a curriculum for discipling new converts into mature disciple-makers and a method for equipping spiritual leaders. The course will also instruct students how to organize and conduct small group ministries, especially within the context of discipleship.

  • 2 credits

THEO 227: Theology of the Christian World Mission

An investigation into the scriptural and theological understanding of the world mission of the Church. Consideration will be given to the biblical data on missions in general, and the missionary mandate in particular, as well as the place of spiritual dynamics in its fulfillment.

Issues such as the uniqueness of Christ and the state of those who have never heard will be discussed. The student will be exposed to philosophical arguments for the Christian mission.

  • 2 credits
  • Same as MISS 227.

THEO 280: Hermeneutics

A course examining the principles and practice of biblical interpretation as well as the primary tools of biblical research. The student will become acquainted with the history of interpretation, contemporary hermeneutical approaches, and a defense of the literal-historical-grammatical approach.

Hermeneutical strategies for interpreting various literary genres, analyzing structural relationships, performing word studies, and developing principles for accurate practical application will be learned.

This course is primarily for students in the Ministerial Education Division; other students are advised to take BIST 270: Bible Study Methods instead, although they may contact the course instructor for permission to take this course.

  • 3 credits

THEO 301: Holiness: Critical Issues

This course seeks to analyze the biblical basis for and meaning of entire sanctification, the witness of the Spirit, the regenerating and indwelling work of the Holy Spirit prior to Pentecost, the difference between the Pneumatological and Christological baptisms with the Holy Spirit, and the role of Pentecost in the life of the believer.

This course also seeks to provide a basic introduction to the life and teachings of John Wesley, his understanding of Christian Perfection, and his view of the witness of the Spirit.

Prerequisites: THEO 202

  • 3 credits

THEO 321: Systematic Theology I

A two-semester study of Bible doctrines formulated into a system. First semester: Revelation, God, Man, and Sin. Second semester: Christ, Salvation, Holy Spirit, and Last Things.

  • 3 credits

THEO 322: Systematic Theology II

A two-semester study of Bible doctrines formulated into a system. First semester: Revelation, God, Man, and Sin. Second semester: Christ, Salvation, Holy Spirit, and Last Things.

  • 3 credits

THEO 441: Senior Worldview Seminar

An interdepartmental seminar that serves as a capstone experience giving students the opportunity to speak and write about various current social and ministry concerns within the context of a Christian worldview.

Prerequisite: Must be a senior

  • 2 credits
  • $10 materials fee

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