History of American Methodism 1784-1900
Course code: HITH 544

History of American Methodism 1784-1900 studies of the growth and development of American Methodism and the rise of the holiness movement. Lectures focus on key personalities, cultural issues and political developments that shaped the American experience of Methodism, specifically the nature and founding of the Methodist Episcopal church vis-à-vis its earliest missionaries to the American colonies, challenges it confronted with established churches, slavery, sectional conflict and the growth of annual and general conferences that gave rise to the holiness advocates.

Intended Outcomes

Students will know…

  • The basic doctrines of Wesleyans and their differences from Reformed adherents in the Colonies.
  • Methodist polity and how it influenced the spread of Methodism, especially on the frontier subsequent to the Treaty of Paris.
  • The ministry and administrative hallmarks of Frances Asbury, Thomas Coke and other significant figures who shaped the movement.
  • The weaknesses of the leaders of the Methodist Episcopal church and principles that can guard the student from such weaknesses in ministry.
  • How gifted and godly leaders have dealt with mavericks in the Church

Students will appreciate…

  • The power of Methodism and the holiness message to transform human character.
  • The tenacity of Methodist circuit riders and their leaders.
  • The effectiveness of the Methodist class meeting and its leaders.
  • The role that wise administration plays in motivating church growth.
  • How a strong marketing plan can impact a community.
  • The strengths of Wesley’s “Quadrilateral” in developing Methodist theology and practices

Assignment Overview

  • Textbook and other assigned reading and responding to related study questions.
  • Ten 2.5-hour live video conference meetings. See the meeting schedule.
  • Research paper and presentation.
  • Final exam.

Professor

Dr. Paul Kaufman

Textbook

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