Interpretation of Romans (English Bible)
Course code: BITH 521

An intensive study of Paul’s letter to the Romans. Special attention is given to the theological structure in Romans and its application to the Christian life. Specific topics for exploration include the relationship of law to grace, the nature of true love as revealed by God, and the strengths and weaknesses of diverse perspectives on Paul.

Intended Outcomes

  • Knowledge of…
    • An outline of both letters and individual chapter content so you have intimate acquaintance with the whole as well as the parts.
    • The meaning and implications of justification by faith alone (Rom. 3:21-5:21).
    • The relationship of Law to grace.
    • Recent developments in scholarship regarding Paul’s doctrine of justification and sanctification.
    • The range of New Testament vocabulary for the results of union with Christ.
  • Appreciation for…
    • God’s law as it applies to Christians.
    • The fact that we are not under the law as a covenant system.
    • Union with Christ and the range of benefits it conveys on believers.
  • Ability to…
    • Explain to others in what ways we are not under the law and yet how the law does apply to Christians.
    • Explain to others the biblical meaning of the terms “justification” and “sanctification.”
    • Explain the relationship between law and grace.
    • Interact with commentaries on Romans in an informed way.
    • Conduct a New Testament word study using English language resources.

Assignment Overview

  • Video lectures (both pre-recorded and synchronous real-time interaction via Google Hangouts) and auxiliary materials will supplement the class textbooks to insure that you are adequately exposed to the necessary information. On occasion, the professor will use a question and answer format (Socratic method) rather than lecture.
  • Readings and study guides are assigned to expose students to the course content. Quizzes will be used to assess learning.
  • Students will write two 6-12 page papers on (1) justification, sanctification, and righteousness in Rom. 3:21-6:23 and (2) the relationship of the Old Testament law to the New Testament believers.
  • Several projects throughout the course will include options for scholarship, ministry and personal development. Here is one example of some options:
    • Scholarship: Read a paper on justification produced by the professor and interact with Tom Wright’s Justification by Faith through Union with Christ,” with his paper on justification. Write up either (1) a 500-700 word blog post or (2) a personal meditation and reflection that concludes with a written prayer about the implications of justification.

Professor

Dr. Allan Brown
Dr. Allan Brown

Textbooks

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